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    Snaring Coyote Tips

    Does anyone have any advice or tips on snaring coyotes? My son and I are going to try give it a go.

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    Hello Dakota Kid
    I have done some coyote snaring. Not sure what you are looking for? equipment? location? etc. Myself I try not to snare fence crossing as it seems to increase non target animals as in deer fawns and antelope. Never put a snare anywhere that cows and horses can be. in general my coyote snares are going to be 10-12 inch loop and around 10 inches off the ground. I use kill poles for my set up as it seems to be fast and easy for me as long as you arent setting rock piles. My snares are 1/16" 1x19 cable with a break away s hook and choke spring to try to reduce to kill quickly with one swivel back at the kill pole. I generally try to set in brushy coundtry then try to lay limbs or sticks over the top of the set that will allow the smaller predators an open runway through but will deter deer antelope and elk from using the trail I set. Hope this helps and let me know if you have anything specific that I might be able to answer.

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    my only advice is make sure you know your state regulations. Some states such as Michigan have lots of rules governing the type of snare and where and how they can be placed.

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    Thanks for the info! Any thoughts on how important scent is? or trying to hide the snare? How about the tracks that you leave in the snow, should I try to take giant steps or shuffle my feet and walk through the set so that the coyotes don't follow my track and not take there normal trail?

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    Scent is definitely something you want to minimize at the set. With a foothold I use coyote urine to mist the whole set, but with a snare I like to leave as little scent as possible since in an ideal snare set the coyote will keep moving, not stop. I do use scent or bait at times, but I'll usually set a dirt hole set there and snare the most likely routes to that location. I keep them back away far enough that the coyote will still be moving steady and not starting to make his more cautious approach that is common at a bait set. I like to set for coyotes in as open area as possible, by using real subtle trails through grass or vegetation. If you use a wire stay and run a whammy of that it will hide real well and not much blending is needed. I never have worried about my foot prints with snares since a coyote will run right down your tracks especially in deep snow!

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    I know in sd your suppose to check your snares every three days by game and fish laws

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    Again thanks for the tips. Any tips on avoiding non target animals? (deer, pets, etc.)

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    Setting in the open like I mentioned above is pretty fool proof for avoiding deer as the loop is lower than their head and nothing is there to make them go under. Fawns have gained enough size by winter to be above the loop also. Smaller animals will travel under the loop safely as well. I have caught a couple cats in these sets, but usually set my snares in tighter cover that coyotes don't like if I'm targeting cats as they like to travel these areas better. Fence crossings can be deadly, but can be tricky to keep non target critters out. if you check for tracks and hair caught in the fence and use common sense on the height of the spot they are using you can usually find crossings that deer aren't using. Just err on the side of caution in these cases. Setting in areas with dogs (pets) is pretty dangerous as a good set for a coyote will usually catch a dog, just too many similarities. It's not worth it, to chance killing someones pet. Be super cautious if using snares in areas that could be used by bird dogs during upland season!
    Last edited by gonhunting247; 02-17-2015 at 08:45 PM.

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    Thanks Again!

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    Good luck, trapping is fun and you will be amazed the details of animal behavior you will pick up. You will most likely learn to look for more subtle sign, that will transfer over to hunting. At least it helps me.
    Have a blast!

 

 

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