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  1. #21
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    Musket Man,

    1st Image: Wipe the blood off the mouth and don't prop his head up on the rifle. Consider rotating his body so his head is to your left (uphill) and let that bush obscure from the mid ribs back to his hind quarters. Another mistake a lot of guys make is wrapping their entire hand or hands around the main beams. This can give the viewer a frame of reference and make the deer look smaller. I would also tip his chin slightly down and quarter turn him to your right. Instead of taking a knee, consider sitting cross leg or on your rear end behind his shoulder making sure your left knee is hidden as much as possible behind the deer. Also be mindful of that brush creeping up over the right side of the bucks face.

    2nd Image: Pretty much the same things apply here as in the first but I like what you're doing with getting the second angle of his rack. You might have considered turning it more to your left to bring out that back fork more.
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  3. #22
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    One thing to understand as well gentlemen, is these are "blue sky" suggestions. Obviously if you have a 600-pound bull facing steeply down hill or locked up in a tree or something, there may not be much you can do with the images/animal in that situation. So take that into consideration when reading the posts. You'll know when you have the time and place to work with the images/animal and when you don't.
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  5. #23
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    Great critique's , keep them coming and the pictures ! I think we all will learn something !

  6. #24
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    Let's Create some office controversy, Dan critique my pictures please:

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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC_0835.JPG  

  7. #25
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    Who wants to guess which one was taken with a cell phone?





    Arise... Kill, Eat! - Acts 10:13

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottR View Post
    Let's Create some office controversy, Dan critique my pictures please:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Oh man, here we go! Hold on while I lock my office door first

    In the first image the grass in the foreground is a little concerning but not terrible. You and your animal are off center in the frame and you might have considered sitting on your rear end to get your knees down. I might suggest propping her head up more as well. I would also suggest taking the pictures angling from the front instead of the rear. You'll also notice you're on the edge of your flash range and the angle up towards the sky washes out the top half of the image. Note: never take pictures where the camera is facing a bright source of light such as sun, sky, etc. This is particularly important with the antler tines are in the bright space as we nearly lose them. Alway have the light to the rear of the camera or at an angle over a shoulder. Be mindful of deep shadows cutting across your trophy to.

    In the second image you have a good background and decently composed shot but the focus appears to be off. You tried to minimize your hands on the rack which is good but might I suggest grabbing him with one hand at the base of his skull or using two fingers on the antler bases just above the ears. Also, this straight on angle doesn't do your buck justice. As a viewer, we can't really get a solid feel for what the rack has going on. The backpack seems to be a major component of the image as well, maybe even so overwhelming it could be considered the focus of the image. Try to minimize the importance of your gear.

    In the thumbnail you've cut off most of the deers body and are centered in the lower right quadrant. This image would not be published because there's not much we can work with and the composition is off. We could possibly use an image like this as a Successful Trophy Hunter at best.

    That brings up a good point to. Don't frame your trophy to tightly to the edge of the image frame as it handcuffs us in the design phase but on the same token, don't leave copious amounts of "air" either. There's a solid middle ground you'll have to develop a feel for.
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  9. #27
    Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elkoholic307 View Post
    Who wants to guess which one was taken with a cell phone?





    You've got some good and bad going on here.

    In the first image the animal is posed well with legs tucked up and under, the goat's chin is level to slightly down and angled to your right slightly so we can get a good feel for his cutters and hooks. The rifle in front is not bad, though I would like to see this pose without the rifle as well for a feature story. You're holding the back of his head and not the horns, very nice. Good, clear foreground. My only suggestions would be to move slightly to your right and sit on your rear end, though that's not a deal breaker. Clean the blood off around his mouth and tip your hat up slightly to lighten your face. Obviously you had flat, overcast light which isn't a bad thing but consider taking a few pictures with the flash as well.

    In the second image you and the animal are positioned well and you're holding the back of his head but I am assuming your fingers were right behind his ears pushing them out, try to grasp a lower vertebrae to alleviate this problem. This is a good example of having the wrong sun angle to. Try to rotate the animal so the sun is at the cameras back, otherwise as you can see, deep shadows came across you and your trophy. Try to clean his mouth up a little more.

    The third image is actually pretty solid. I would tip his hat up slightly to lighten his face. I would also turn the animals head to his right slightly and tuck in the tongue. Consider positioning the hunter behind the bucks shoulder for a few shots as well. The image is cropped tight to the top of his hat and the animals leg which doesn't give us much to work with. Other than that it's a solid, clean photo.
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  10. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by D.Turvey, Jr View Post
    One thing to understand as well gentlemen, is these are "blue sky" suggestions. Obviously if you have a 600-pound bull facing steeply down hill or locked up in a tree or something, there may not be much you can do with the images/animal in that situation. So take that into consideration when reading the posts. You'll know when you have the time and place to work with the images/animal and when you don't.
    Copy that! The ram picture I posted the ground is WAY steeper than it looks. There was no way I was going to try to move it away from the two trees that were keeping it from rolling down the hill.
    That finger ridge across the cayon above my head is where I killed him.


  11. #29
    Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
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    Ah c'mon, a sheep hunter eats country like that for breakfast. What's moving a 300-pound ram uphill compared to that
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  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by D.Turvey, Jr View Post
    AK,

    For support photos those would work reasonably well. Way to make a guy with a desk job jealous Love that country up there.
    Thanks; I like the 3rd photo because it was taken a second after my son sat up from watching his bull drop. His smile is real.
    We didn't get the ram that we were after...a 44" beast. The caribou was consolation on the final day.

    This is a really good thread; I've always been an avid picture taker...I'm trying to become a photographer. Critiques help a lot!

 

 

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