Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 38 of 38
  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    north idaho
    Posts
    325
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 40 Times in 28 Posts
    Congratulations
    18
    Congratulated 32 Times in 4 Posts
    unfortunately we have learned, that pets, that stray, go away. It is kind of hard to kill every predator around.
    I wish you luck, but If you live on the outskirts of town, dead pets is part of the price of living there. not trying to be mean or calouse, just real.

  2. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Carlin, NV
    Posts
    687
    Thanks
    96
    Thanked 100 Times in 97 Posts
    Congratulations
    57
    Congratulated 21 Times in 2 Posts
    Dang jjenness, sorry to hear you lost another pet. I was thinking on the same line as Grizz, as long as you can train a german shepard to come back home, I agree he/she will keep coyotes away and be a great family dog.

  3. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Eastern Nebraska
    Posts
    823
    Thanks
    566
    Thanked 279 Times in 196 Posts
    Congratulations
    111
    Congratulated 75 Times in 8 Posts
    Get a male Lab and get him cut as soon as he is old enough. My Labradors always held their own with the coyotes. Never had one run away either after they were fixed. Great family dogs and very easy to train. Should fix your coyote problem.

  4. #34
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Northern, Ohio
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    Congratulations
    9
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Sorry to hear about your dog- get a FoxPro electronic caller and go coyote hunting.

  5. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    SE Minnesota
    Posts
    62
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 16 Times in 12 Posts
    Congratulations
    14
    Congratulated 5 Times in 1 Post
    Snares are going to be your best bet for yotes. Much less work to keep functioning in tough weather and cheaper than foot trap. Also much higher yield than calling/shooting. Rally Hess is a great guy to get snares from in terms of quality, price and helpfulness. Google his name and "snares" and you will get his number. Get loaded snares, wherever you get them from though, all Rally's are loaded. This means the loop is shaped so it hangs in a circle instead of a tear drop, and they "fire" in a way when they hit the bottom of the loop reducing back outs. Avoid deer trails all together not because of catches but knock downs. Properly set coyote snares should not be an issue for house cats or deer. I use 8-10" loop 8-10" off the ground depending on terrain. I prefer to set in their natural travel path and not try to force them down much or use bait. Setting a carcass or bait pile is fine but hang snares no closer than 20yds, preferably much further on the trails then start to use. Further from the bait they will be moving less cautiously. I like 5/64" cable with a BMI mini lock. I anchor up high and use about 5-6' extensions so they wrap up. All you need is a bunch of snares (abou $1.25/ea), a roll of 11 or 14ga wire, some extensions, and a linesmans pliers. If you find a set of tracks find where it passes through some cover and/or an adequate place to support and anchor the snare and hang a loop. They walk in their EXACT tracks the next time they come through, unless there has been a big snow. Sometimes what looks like one set of tracks in the snow is really 2,3,4 or more yotes in a line walking right in the same tracks.

    Satisfied customers


    Last edited by johnsd16; 04-16-2014 at 08:33 AM.

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to johnsd16 For This Useful Post:


  7. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Lewistown, MT
    Posts
    338
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 95 Times in 59 Posts
    Congratulations
    20
    Congratulated 58 Times in 4 Posts
    So how much does the loop come into play? All the snares I set have that tear drop look, is this ok? Also I set them all on fence lines, and just hung them off the bottom strand of barb wire. Also, I did not put any extensions on the snares, will this still work? Lots of questions, but I guess it is going to be just a lot of trial and error.
    JJenness
    G
    &T Crazy

  8. #37
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    SE Minnesota
    Posts
    62
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 16 Times in 12 Posts
    Congratulations
    14
    Congratulated 5 Times in 1 Post
    Quote Originally Posted by jjenness View Post
    So how much does the loop come into play? All the snares I set have that tear drop look, is this ok? Also I set them all on fence lines, and just hung them off the bottom strand of barb wire. Also, I did not put any extensions on the snares, will this still work? Lots of questions, but I guess it is going to be just a lot of trial and error.

    With non-loaded or teardrop looped snares there is more drag of the lock in the cable while they close. Not as big of an issue if you are snaring in an area where you expect the animal to be moving quickly. I have seen enough evidence of back outs in the snow that I only use loaded cable. They can still do it when it's loaded but not if it gets behind their ears. With unloaded they can sometimes even back out with an ear or two in.

    Snaring fences can get messy. What are you anchoring the snare to? Be ready to have the fence all but torn down if you do hook up a yote. When you snare a fence crawl under you really increase your chances for non target catches (non coyote in your case) because everything that is as tall or taller than that bottom strand has to duck under it and you will hook up things that would normally walk under a 10" high loop like cats, badgers, skunks, etc. Setting on a coyotes tracks you will rarely ever catch something else. You want to walk along side their trail off about 10' or more touching as little as you can around you. Then, when you see the spot you want to set come in from the side and make as little disturbance as possible. The snare needs to be supported well so the loop will stay in place until their head is in it and then come loose when the bottom of their neck really starts to pull. There is a learning curve but once you get the hang of snaring there is no better legal way to really thin out coyotes.

    Ask away, I'm a FNG here and know little about western hunting but hanging coyotes I know something about.
    Last edited by johnsd16; 04-17-2014 at 11:44 PM.

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to johnsd16 For This Useful Post:


  10. #38
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 13 Times in 2 Posts
    Snareshop.com has a lot of supplies and at a fair price.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Family Fun Video ( Funny )
    By N.Y.ArcheryMadMan in forum Back at the Tailgate
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-14-2014, 10:28 AM
  2. bull killed by cops???
    By ivorytip in forum Colorado
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-20-2013, 11:34 AM
  3. Hounds killed by wolves
    By MSUcat61 in forum General Hunting
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 01-19-2013, 04:27 PM
  4. Let's see your first muley you killed!
    By velvetfvr in forum Mule Deer
    Replies: 81
    Last Post: 06-14-2012, 01:32 AM
  5. Nonresident Family Discount Tag Program
    By Bitterroot Bulls in forum Montana
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-17-2012, 05:37 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •