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  1. #1
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    Bow question for you all

    In your guys opinion are the hoyt carbon bows not a good idea in the back country?
    I'm getting ready to get a different bow and am looking at the hoyt line and I have heard some say that the carbon bows are not as durable finish wise as the aluminum riser bows. So thought I would ask some of your all and see what your thoughts were on this.


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  2. #2
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    Personally, I don't worry as much about the finish on the bow as I do how it shoots. I would take note of issues that effect the shooting of the bow, but if the finish wears off a little that's no big deal. I have a buddy that shoots the first version of the Hoyt Carbon bow, whatever the name is, and he loves it, but does more whitetail hunting than anything. Personally, make sure the bow fits you before buying it, then worry about aesthetic touch ups
    Now therefore, please take your weapons, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me.
    Genesis 27:3 (NKJV)

  3. #3
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    Like tdcour said, who cares about the finish, as long as the bow performs. Slipping down a rock slide will take the paint off an aluminum bow just as quickly as a carbon bow.
    Live to hunt, hunt to live.

  4. #4
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    I think getting a bow that "feels right" is the most important thing.
    Hard to go wrong with the high end bows today but by all means shoot every one you can before dropping $800 or more on a new one.
    My other opinion is to keep at least one older bow as a backup if something goes wrong on your primary.
    Life member RMEF
    Mathews DXT, Bowtech Admiral, Browing .300WSM...... and Swarovski Optiks my wife doesn't know about.
    1999 Washington Blacktaill, Bear River GMU, nontypical 6X7

  5. #5
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    I just picked up my Experience today and had a good discussion with my dealer about the carbon bows. It's all about what you want but he is shooting and is very impressed with the Diamond Carbon Cure. He likes it better than the Bowtech Carbon Knight. I compared both at the shop and agree. For the price I was almost walking out with the Carbon Cure. It's not quite as fast but is a heck of a lot smoother than the knight or experience. As for the finishes the camo/carbon looks and feels just like the aluminum but the black/carbon kinda reminded me of plastic.

  6. #6
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    I've owned three carbon bows. The 2011 & 2013 Elements and I just bought a 2014 Carbon Spyder Turbo. They've all been great bows. Yes the finish will definitely wear off after normal use, especially around the grip area. I also have aluminum riser bows and the finish wears off eventually. Like stated and I totally agree when I purchase a bow it's about shoot ability. No hunting bow will stay in mint condition forever.

    Remember your vehicle or clothes don't stay in mint condition forever.

    Is carbon for bows for everyone no. I definitely wouldn't base my decision on buying a bow just because the finish comes off.

  7. #7
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    I shoot an elite, but I really liked the new line of Hoyt's. All Hoyt's are durable. That's what I like about them. You can drop it hard pick it up and shoots like a champ. On bone collector last week Waddell drove over his dads Hoyt with a buggy didn't hurt it. I think you'll be fine


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    The Rockies are the marrow of the world.

  8. #8
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    I wouldn't worry about "finish". It only impacts resale value...and that really shouldn't factor in for deciding the best bow for you. As for durability, they're all about the same. You take a fall and whack the riser, most will be fine regardless of material. Do the same and whack the cams and it won't matter which bow you bought. The outcome will be the same.

    I have aluminum, but feel carbon is certainly the future. The only reason I didn't go carbon when I bought my last setup was the cost. I narrowed it down to two bows after shooting about 10. Let the feel of the bow, not the material or specs, determine what was best. There will be some big differences in the feel. The last two felt nearly identical, but aluminum was a couple hundred cheaper and there was no weight advantage. Still happy with it.

  9. #9
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    been using a 2010 Hoyt Carbon Matrix for mule deer and elk hunts in Montana and Colorado. never had an issue with scraping the finish off while hunting. i will say it has a little finish wear in the grip area but thats it from all the shooting i do year round and 3D.

    what's most important about a back country hunt is bringing a bow you can shoot well. one that is slightly lighter can help but i don't subscribe to that theory. i like a heavy bow i believe it helps me hold better on target and in the wind.

    Sent via Crypto KG84 Algorithm

  10. #10
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    i have 2012 carbon element. i am hard on my bow living in thick western Washington it is always going though the brush. Finnish is coming off a little but not bad (mostly around grip). i love the bow and and how it shoots. so far having some finish worn off hasn't stopped it from killing animals!!

 

 

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