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  1. #1
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    Angled or Straight?

    Good morning everyone, I have decided to purchase a Vortex Razor HD spotting scope after reading a lot of the reviews on them. Only thing to do now is decide weather or not to get an angled one or a straight one. What are the advantages and disadvantages of both and what style do you have and why? Any help with decision would be much appreciated. I do most of my hunting in New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming, both in the high country and lower desert terrain. Thanks in advance

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    i cant think of one disadvantage to getting angled

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    I have angled and would buy straight if I ever buy another spotter. Way more options for comfortable use. You are always above the angled spotter unless you turn it and then you're at an odd angle.

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    I have the Razor angled. I always prefer angled over straight though with spotters, just my personal preference though.

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    i think it is personal preference. i like straight because it is faster for me to locate animals after i see them in binos, and i like to be able to sit up and look though rather than have to bend my neck or back.

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    good points, im use to angles, making straight a little diff for me but it would go both ways. if you arent buying online have a sells rep take ya outside and compare the two.

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    Thanks for the info everyone, I think im leaning more towards a straight after reading a few of the other posts on this subject.

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    I would take ivorytip's advice and try both options to see what YOU like better. It is really a matter of personal preference. Myself, I like straight scopes. They work better on a window mount and more comfortable when glassing down a mountain or on flat terrain.

    My buddy has an angled and I do think it is more comfortable when looking up a mountain.
    "Elk don't know how many feet a horse has!"

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    really its going to come down to your preference. Try out each and see which one suits you best.

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    I have straight and wish I had angled. Both have pros/cons. Trying them out in a store really doesn't give you a true experience for what you might prefer in the field. I recommend really thinking about when you'll use it and under what conditions.

    If you generally glass up mountains, then angled are easier. Simply because you don't need to raise the tripod as far to get a comfortable viewing position/angle....ie avoid cocking your neck back to see up straight glass to see up a mountain. It's more comfortable to use angled, especially if looking for longer periods of time (ie scanning vs looking at something specific). If you generally glass down from a high spot, then straight is easier. Again, a more natural position for aligning your eye with the objective and target area. As for flat land, straight is a little easier.

    Couple observations I've made about my hunting habits. Very rarely do I use it on flat land. I mainly use it for elk and mule deer, so lots of up and down viewing....at least in Idaho and Colorado where I've hunted most. Once In awhile I'll antelope hunt, in which case it's flat land and straight is easier. But that is rare. Be sure to understand how you hunt the most, what angles and your preferred viewing posture. Straight often means you need to bring the entire scope up to head level, where angled you don't. This will become obvious when you play with them at viewing angles. If looking up a mountain to glass it almost seems ridiculous with straight spotting scopes how high you need to raise the tripod to see. I don't like raising the tripod that high. More on that in a second. On a steeper slope the downhill side of the tripod might need pretty long legs to be level with your head. I noticed this when glassing cross canyon a few years ago. Just means you need a bigger tripod to be comfortable. I'm surprised how often I can't find level-ish ground and just make due. The angled spotter allows for a shorter tripod and lower stance. A straight spotter, due to the height needed to view, has a higher center of gravity and increases the likeliness of it falling over, especially if uneven terrain or windy conditions, which it often the case. I've caught mine tipping over due to a gust of wind or a numb foot bumping a leg of the tripod after sitting too long. So for me lower is better, more stable. I started hanging a pack under the center of the tripod to add weight and stability, but that's a pain in the butt to deal with....and the damn thing still finds ways to tip.

    Also, I've noticed I use mine more looking up a mountain than down. Why? Well in reality spotters weigh a lot. So if I don't think I need it or have a plan to glass, I try to save weight and often won't bring it on a hike. Call it lazy...or 5 days into an elk hunt, chalk it up to leg fatigue. So I don't carry it high in the mountains as often as I expected and gets used for lower viewing angles more often (looking up hill more than down - angled is better in that case). Another observation, most glassing is done at first light. Very little is done mid day and maybe a little at dark. I don't know about you, but most places I hunt I'm starting low and hiking high. Sometimes I hike in the early morning darkness to get high to glass, but more often than not I don't get far enough. That "get to the top before light" attitude only seems to happen the first day or two. Thus, the rest of the time I'm still hiking up and glassing up in the morning. The hikes to the top of the mountains can take hours, so same factor applies with last light. Since it's a long hike down the mountain, I'm not staying high until after dark. So it doesn't get used as much at that time, from a high position.

    If you mainly backpack hunted and did spike camp, you might have the opposite opinion. I thought that was me, but that's more the exception than the rule.

    So all those factors for me add up to why I like angled better. I'm more often looking up vs down when using it. Angled is more comfortable when doing so. Angled also offers a lower stance, which means a shorter and lighter tripod can be used. The shorter tripod is a more stable platform. Hope this makes sense and gives some food for thought in the evaluation of your purchase.

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