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  1. #1
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    What pack size for small spike hunts

    Just trying to get some more ideas for a hunt. We are thinking we might take my camper and use it as a base camp and spike out for 2-3 days from there for our hunt in CO. What size pack would be best for a hunt lilt that to spike out with
    Would 2000 be enough or would I be better off with something in the 3000ci range bee better


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    i think you could do 3000 but why not go for 4000+ if you can strap things tight so it rides you will have more room to pack meat

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    Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
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    Lots of options out there. Honestly if you are on a budget just get a pack frame and stuff the gear in a dry bag.

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    About the only difference in backing for 2 days or 10 is how much food you will need to take. Im sure it could be done with a 2000 but it would get small pretty fast I think. Another thing to consider is packing game out. I have a military ILBE pack that I think is 4500 and I wouldnt want anything smaller for over night trips.
    "Now two flags fly above my land that really sum up how I fee. One is the colors that fly high and proud The red, the white, the blue. The other one's got a rattlesnake With a simple statement made "Don't tread on me" is what it says and I'll take that to my grave. Because this is me. I'm proud to be American and strong in my beliefs. And I've said it before but I'll say it again 'Cause my family's always fought and died to save this land. And a country boy is all I'll ever be."

  5. #5
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    Ditto from above.
    The setup never changes, just the load that goes on it. I have a 3300.
    weekend trip - everything goes in the bag
    5-6 day trip - one or 2 dry bags strapped to the sides
    9-10 day trip - 3 dry bags strapped to the sides and the top.

    I bought the smaller bag with this plan in mind. When I dump base camp, I can condense a little smaller and cleaner than the bigger bags. There is also a weight transfer benefit when you have loose bags that can be strapped where you want such as over the top of your animal head. If you are not good with strapping stuff on the sides, you better be getting a big bag.

    Scott's on the money also. Go grab a cabelas pack frame and you are good to go if you have some other priorities for cash. I have decades of luck with a frame of that sort. Mine is basically a copy of the Cabelas Alaskan 1 with the bag on it. The bag is simple with no frills. It has a main bag and 2 long pockets. You can buy this for about $130. I have moved up to one of the better bags, but I would have no hesitation taking my old frame out on any hunt.

  6. #6
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    I have one of the Cabelas Alaskan series bag and frames that has been around for a few years. It was marketed as a lighter version, I didn't see it on a quick check of their site just now. Anyway, they do a good job. My frame has packed a fair amount of meat and I've carried it with a daypack strapped to it, but I have never used the Cabelas bag in the field. I don't like how noisy the material is. I also got an Eberlestock J34 and use it instead. They aren't ideal, the weight extends out further from your back instead of up as you continue adding stuff to them. I like the scabbard and how it works as a daypack enough to overlook that. It compacts to 2300 and expands way up from that depending on accessories added. It still packs weight and meat pretty darn good to get the first load back to the truck, and I can always go back in with the frame for the rest. For a 2-3 day trip I'd definitely choose my J34 and keep my gear weight down as much as possible. For a long trip with a lot more weight I may start thinking about switching to the Cabelas set-up and just adding a small daypack inside, leaving the big pack at camp.

    A huge thing to consider for your trips in is water sources where you are going. If you have to pack water very far it changes everything including your menu.

  7. #7
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    I like to economize and get a pack that will expand or shrink depending on what you need at the moment. Almost any of the new packs out there can do this. I have an Eberlestock J107, and I got it for exactly that reason. For day packing, I can shrink it down to around 2500 cc, but if I'm packing camp or loads of meat, it will expand to slightly more than double that. I'm actually looking to upgrade with one of the newer pack models out there, and if you do it right, most can double as both day packs and camp/meat haulers.

  8. #8
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    I can get a 3 day hunt into a 2400 MR-Longbow. I strap my sleeping bag on the bottom and air pad on top and were good to go.

    TALL, WIDE and HANDSOME

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    "The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential... these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence."
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  9. #9
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    I am not a big fan of putting things on the outside if I don't have to. Not that I won't do it, but I have just never been a fan of it. If things are tight, the load shelf concept works well IMO.

    This is an SG Solo, stuffed to the gills, with my SO 6 man in the load shelf and a week's worth of gear. My spotting scope is on the outside, but other than that I really didn't want much else hanging out there.

    You can see in this picture from a late season trip that Guy took for mule deer that with the exception of his sleeping bag, there really isn't much hanging out there for brush to grab onto. This trip was supposed to be a late season rut hunt with a bunch of snow so he brought a heavy bag. Unseasonably warm weather dictated that they needed to backpack in and he had to put this bag on the outside.

    For reference I am including the videos Guy just did on packing for the backcountry:
    Last edited by ScottR; 05-21-2014 at 08:28 AM.

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