Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 29
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    potosi, wisconsin
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts

    First time backpack hunting

    Im looking to try something new this year. I'm hunting the big horns region Y and will be there for a week. I'd like to try backpack hunting for a night or two. This will be second 2nd year in the horns and 4 year in Wyoming (previously region C). With that being said what should a guy look for when packing the bag to head in for the night? My initial thoughts are tent, sleeping bag, lighter, water, dehydrated food of some sort, and of course my normal hunting gear.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Gillette, WY
    Posts
    289
    Thanks
    259
    Thanked 69 Times in 62 Posts
    Congratulations
    7
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    bug spray, lots of bug spray. There are lots of good options here about this sort of thing I am not sure why I am posting, but sometimes its fun to pretend to know something. I wasn't sure if you were packing water, but a water purifier would be fine. There are lots of little streams and stuff in the Big Horns, but cows like them, too. So no raw water. Being hydrated is a huge concern with the exercise and the altitude, you really have to watch out. You need lots of calories, too. For the food make sure the dehydrated food has a lot of protein, not just noodles. I think there are a lot of package meals made especially for backpackers. Those magnesium fire starters are kindof fun, I think they work pretty well. There can be fire restrictions, so watch out for those as the time comes up. I personally don't like lighters because I keep burning my fingers. Lighting a candle with a lighter works for me I guess, so bring a lighter and some candles. Extra socks and clothes are a must. Bring clothes for cold, snow, and wet just in case at any time of year. With my kid in Boy Scouts, I kindof cheat and just go down their checklist. Compass, GPS, maps, hatchet, a couple good knives, sharpener, cook stove, my list seems to get bigger all the time. Those are probably part of your normal hunting gear. There are some pretty light weight tents and sleeping bags, and there is a thread here about floorless tarp tents or some such thing. Good to look into. You might be looking at a 50# pack with a weeks worth of stuff, so no extras. 50# is a lot for me for longer distances, at least its downhill on the way back. Those Wal-Mart sleeping bags rated for +40 might not cut it, it can get a little chilly at times. Well have fun. Hope you get some good info from these guys. Oh bear bag, rope, and spray, almost forgot.
    Last edited by Againstthewind; 05-05-2014 at 07:28 PM.

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Againstthewind For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    potosi, wisconsin
    Posts
    23
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Not sure why I never thought of the bug spray but defiantly going to have it with.

    With being in the horns for a week we do have a at one of the lodges, so im gonna watch the weather forecast a bit and pick a favorable night to try the first over nighter.

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Posts
    521
    Thanks
    198
    Thanked 103 Times in 83 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 1 Time in 1 Post
    I have spent some miserable times in some bug infested destinations.
    Even deer hunted in the coastal swamps of North Carolina where the mosquitos reminded me of dragon flies.
    The big tiger striped skeeters just drilled right through mesh gloves so I wore surgical gloves underneath to fend them off.

    My point is, while hunting I do my best to avoid bug spray, but I have been forced to wipe a little dirt flavored stuff around the holes in my bug hood.

    A couple of years ago I started using a thermacell and it works pretty well if you are sitting still and the wind is fairly calm.
    Life member RMEF
    Mathews DXT, Bowtech Admiral, Browing .300WSM...... and Swarovski Optiks my wife doesn't know about.
    1999 Washington Blacktaill, Bear River GMU, nontypical 6X7

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to OregonJim For This Useful Post:


  7. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Gillette, WY
    Posts
    289
    Thanks
    259
    Thanked 69 Times in 62 Posts
    Congratulations
    7
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    That is a good point. The extra deet smell is probably not helpful for hunting. I will have to look into alternatives like what you mentioned. I don't think the blood suckers are as big and nasty as in swampy NC, but they can sure be a nuisance. I got a little carried away, a 50# pack is probably a bit much for a night or two, sorry about that. I was trying to cook dinner, watch tv and write at the same time.
    Last edited by Againstthewind; 05-05-2014 at 10:48 PM.

  8. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    149
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 47 Times in 31 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    A light shelter, a sleeping pad, bag or quilt, and your pack make up what is known as your base weight. That is where your biggest weight savings (or gain) will be found. My base weight will range from around 8 lbs to around 9 or 10 depending on season.

    Food for me is jerky, nuts, fruit leather, nut butter, etc. Clothing is wool base layers, pants, insulating shirt, windshirt, puffy jacket, maybe a rainjacket.

    For two nights I can probably get down into the 25-27 lb range with hunting gear.

    Above 10k and bugs aren't as much of an issue, especially in Sept.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to RockChucker30 For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    50
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 6 Times in 5 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Plan for success, so have game bags with you as well as some light rope to hang them in trees. Also make sure you have all the cutting tools you would need to cut up an animal. Another little item I found handy once-I pitched my green Eureka tent in some timber and then after wandering around all morning I had a tough time finding my way back to spike camp. The GPS didn't read very well under al that timber. Good thing I had hung an orange bandana in a tree near the tent so I was able to find it. I have also left something orange at a kill site to help mark the spot if I had to leave something out to go retrieve a backpack or something.

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to sheephunter For This Useful Post:


  12. #8
    Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    748
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 358 Times in 153 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 4 Times in 3 Posts
    I am putting together an excel sheet of my gear list to share here. I will put Guy's list in the same post.

  13. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to ScottR For This Useful Post:


  14. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    West Jordan, UT
    Posts
    148
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    If you know how to bone an animal out, you can get by with just one knife or maybe two. I like to carry a havalon because it's easy to trade out blades when one gets dull. I also carry a small lockback knife with a 3 or 4" blade in case I need some backbone when cutting.

    Never go into the woods without rain gear...unless you like being wet and cold. The time you don't think you need it, it will rain on you. Mountain weather is fickle - especially at elevation.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to MWScott72 For This Useful Post:


  16. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    388
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 31 Times in 29 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    A backup light even if it is a small keychain light. A small first aid kit. You can buy one at your outdoor store, and will work fine as is. I then pack a few other things for my personal needs(pain reliever of choice, moleskin,....).

    CAMERA!! Solitude is great, but it is nice to share with others what you did and what you saw.

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to tttoadman For This Useful Post:


 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •