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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sheephunter View Post
    Plan for success, so have game bags with you as well as some light rope to hang them in trees. Also make sure you have all the cutting tools you would need to cut up an animal. Another little item I found handy once-I pitched my green Eureka tent in some timber and then after wandering around all morning I had a tough time finding my way back to spike camp. The GPS didn't read very well under al that timber. Good thing I had hung an orange bandana in a tree near the tent so I was able to find it. I have also left something orange at a kill site to help mark the spot if I had to leave something out to go retrieve a backpack or something.
    Good idea! I carry hot pink vet wrap in my little home made first aid kit. It weighs less than an ounce and can be used to help bandage a wound or mark trails like you use the bandana. A roll goes quite a way and can be used to mark multiple points or leave a trail if needed. The pink shows up better than the other colors. It came in handy finding which downed trees my bull slid in behind last year when we went back in with horses, glassed the vet-wrap tied head high right off.

  2. #12
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    A few items I like also

    Mammut S-lite headlamps. With a lithium battery they weigh 1.7oz, and use a AA battery like my GPS and camera. I carry one in my daypack survival kit as a spare and one in my hunting gear.

    Havalon Barracuta knife. Most people prefer the smaller Piranta, and I like to carry one of those also for caping. For quartering or boning though I like the bigger knife. I also like that I can use either skinning or boning blades with it.

    I have a little survival/first aid/repair kit I always throw in also, I take it in whatever pack or fishing bag I'm carrying. My licenses go in it so I don't forget either of them. The items that need extra water protection are in a ziplock, then it is all stuffed into a mesh bag. Here is what it has evolved to currently. I could eliminate some of these items when carrying camping gear, but I carry them anyway. I may get caught away from camp and want them in my daypack.

    Basic Full-time daypack kit (1lb 7oz)
    -stainless steel water bottle (wrapped in camo cloth tape for silence and to eliminate reflection)
    -spare wool socks
    -Adventure medical heatsheets bivy (the 3.8oz one)
    -cheap mylar space blanket (mainly for a fire reflector)
    -compass
    -bandana (red for signal, pre-filter water etc)
    -Mammut S-lite headlamp (1 AA lithium battery, 60hr life, 2oz) (this is part of the kit, and in addition to the second one I count as hunting gear)
    -fire kit: firesteel, lighter, vaseline coated cotton balls in Menthos container, 4 wetfire cubes
    -50ft roll 2" duck tape
    -small bottle superglue
    -frontier water filter straw
    -10 tablets potable aqua water purifier
    -30yds 152lb bank line
    -15yds 350lb bank line (great for boot laces)
    -25ft bright yellow paracord
    -blank CD (signalling)
    -little bag with a dozen 45lb 18” cable fishing leaders & 30ft 25lb fishing line, 20ft 10lb fishing line, 12 hooks, repair needle (weighs 1.2oz)
    Medical: (stop bleeding, make splints)
    -quick clot sponge
    -1 roll hot pink vetwrap (bandaging with duck tape, marking trail, etc)
    -small tube neosporin
    -4 3"x3" gauze pads
    -rubber glove
    -6 pills immodium
    -2 pills claritin
    -1 packet sunscreen
    -1 packet lip balm
    -4 safety pins
    -1 antiseptic towlette

    The little kit with the fishing stuff, leaders, and needles isn't really necessary in the mountains probably, but I just leave it in everywhere. It only weighs 1.2oz and I amaze myself sometimes what I can rig up with some fishing line, super glue, a repair needle, and some duck tape to fix things.
    Last edited by mcseal2; 05-06-2014 at 09:41 PM.

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  4. #13
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    Good advice on here, be sure to have a GPS and Google Earth your area and plan your route before you take off!

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  6. #14
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    I have not read all of the posts in reply to this so sorry for possibly repeating. Bugs would most likely not be too much of an issue at high elevations. I would bring a small travel size bottle because it doesn't weigh much or take up much space, but you would most likely not need it. If you are looking to go light, a small backpacking tent is great, but for just one or two nights a rain fly will do the trick. Look up links to setting it up, but you can take a cheap tarp that has about a foot of extra room to your right and left and about 1.5' of clearance on your head when laying down. Take a small diameter log (roughly 3in) and the length is equal to your width of the tarp. Roll it up on the end with the log faced toward the sloped end to let water run down underneath you. A light weight ran fly over your head using trekking poles or a strong stick. That is a light weight tent configuration that works very well. You are exposed to the outside air, but at high elevations you won't have problems with bugs and it is fun to "rough" it. The lighter you are, the faster you can hunt.

  7. #15
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    You can carry bug spray buy I haven 't needed it in Y for my last two September hunts there. You will need road hunter repellent, though. It also gets cold at night at 8500 feet so be prepared for one night in the teens. Unscented baby wipes are money. A water filter system with a pump would be handy, I don't trust the cattle tanks. Rain gear is a must. Known good hiking boots are a must, along with wool or wool blend socks, no cotton. A gps with plat map is essential, lotsa private land at the edges and jutting into BHNF. Good luck.
    Using Tapatalk

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  9. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanPickar View Post
    Good advice on here, be sure to have a GPS and Google Earth your area and plan your route before you take off!
    Got the GPS and have been spending lots of time on google earth. I have a week off work approximently a month before my season. So I'm gonna head out and do some scouting and try some of my gear. Were gun hunting so our season aint till October. Lets just hope there isn't as much snow as there was last year
    Last edited by wisconsin_guy; 05-09-2014 at 06:50 PM.

  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by OregonJim View Post
    I have spent some miserable times in some bug infested destinations.
    Even deer hunted in the coastal swamps of North Carolina where the mosquitos reminded me of dragon flies.
    The big tiger striped skeeters just drilled right through mesh gloves so I wore surgical gloves underneath to fend them off.
    You must be familiar with Camp Lejeune!

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  12. #18
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    You'll learn through trial and error that what works for someone else is entirely different than you!!
    TICK
    TALL, WIDE and HANDSOME


    "The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential... these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence."
    Confucius

  13. #19
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    You have to decide for yourself what's important to you. I'll sometimes leave my stove, deluxe food, camera and spotting scope at home. But I'll always bring extra socks and a backup knife. Even a small sharp pocket knife could save me 10+ extra miles if I were to dull or lose a knife.

    And always go over your list one more time before you leave home, and before you leave the vehicle.

  14. #20
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    By the end of August in the Bighorns, there really is no mosquitos. They are present during the summer months at any elevation, I know first hand!

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