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  1. #61
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    I thought the only gun Topgun owned was a 30-06. LOL
    Keystone 1, Over!

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  2. #62
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    The reason I would "handicap" myself with the 223 WSSM would be #1 because it's what I have and #2 it would make the hunt more challenging, just as it would for someone choosing to use a bow and arrow, or a 30/30 open sighted rifle.

    As for what Chuck Hawk wrote, I can also find writers who have said the 22-250 is a great antelope cartridge. One of which is John Barsness, and he's one whose opinion I hold in very high regard. I can't say the same about Chuck Hawk.

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  4. #63
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    Here you go again comparing the 223 with "challenging" like using a bow and arow setup, LOL! Sir, you need to reread what was in the first paragraph of the article I posted and learn a little bit more about ballistics than it appears you know right now. It seems that you and several others are so high on these little calibers because of their extremely high velocity. However, high velocity doesn't mean squat on a bigger animal if the bullet lacks the sectional density and mass to do the job properly and that's exactly why the small calibers that have been mentioned in this thread were designed for varmints for the most part. At least use the higher grain bullet available for your "fun" if you take that 223 WSSM out to shoot an antelope, as well as keeping the distance a lot shorter than you would when out for woodchucks, yotes, etc. and put it back through their ribs for good penetration. Hey by golly, if you want a "real challenge and even more fun", I have a 22 Hornet you can borrow for your lope hunt---NOT!
    Last edited by Topgun 30-06; 05-16-2014 at 12:15 PM.

  5. #64
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    Im still not understanding why you refer to a doe antelope as a "bigger animal". I took ridicule when I shot my first antelope with a 300 rum so I shot the next one with a 220 swift. I seriously doubt either lope could tell tell you if it was a .224 or a .308 bullet that killed it. All that I can tell you is that in my observation the one shot with the rum had some meat left on it but the one shot with the swift had liquefied organs and dropped on the spot. Im not trying to start an argument but we all have differing opinions on the matter and in my opinion people tend to jump on the "humane bandwagon" when they are only relying on their personal opinion. In my observation both arguments have their points but the argument that a doe antelope is a "bigger animal" wont hold water. Im finished debating the matter.
    Quote Originally Posted by Topgun 30-06 View Post
    Here you go again comparing the 223 with "challenging" like using a bow and arow setup, LOL! Sir, you need to reread what was in the first paragraph of the article I posted and learn a little bit more about ballistics than it appears you know right now. It seems that you and several others are so high on these little calibers because of their extremely high velocity. However, high velocity doesn't mean squat on a bigger animal if the bullet lacks the sectional density and mass to do the job properly and that's exactly why the small calibers that have been mentioned in this thread were designed for varmints for the most part. At least use the higher grain bullet available for your "fun" if you take that 223 WSSM out to shoot an antelope, as well as keeping the distance a lot shorter than you would when out for woodchucks, yotes, etc. and put it back through their ribs for good penetration. Hey by golly, if you want a "real challenge and even more fun", I have a 22 Hornet you can borrow for your lope hunt---NOT!

  6. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampokie View Post
    Im still not understanding why you refer to a doe antelope as a "bigger animal". I took ridicule when I shot my first antelope with a 300 rum so I shot the next one with a 220 swift. I seriously doubt either lope could tell tell you if it was a .224 or a .308 bullet that killed it. All that I can tell you is that in my observation the one shot with the rum had some meat left on it but the one shot with the swift had liquefied organs and dropped on the spot. Im not trying to start an argument but we all have differing opinions on the matter and in my opinion people tend to jump on the "humane bandwagon" when they are only relying on their personal opinion. In my observation both arguments have their points but the argument that a doe antelope is a "bigger animal" wont hold water. Im finished debating the matter.
    The two calibers you mentioned are most certainly to the extremes for shooting an antelope! I would hope that any serious hunter would realize and know that the small 22 calibers we are talking about on this thread were designed and considered to be for varmints up through an animal the size of a coyote so that distance can be stretched out somewhat. The WSSM caliber has now had a couple of heavier for caliber bullets designed for larger animals up to about the size of an antelope, but it's not just my opinion about them being marginal on big game like that. Almost everything I've read by well know writers that have used them, including the article I posted that I just happened to pull up on a quick search, says they are marginal for most game over approximately 100#. I have for many decades gone along with the theory that bigger is better, within reason, as far as using the proper size caliber and bullet for the intended game. I would hazard a guess that for every one that says these small calibers are fine for bigger game that there are a hundred or more that would disagree and if someone wants to accuse me of "jumping on the humane bandwagon" as you called it, I'll say thank you when we're talking about taking another creatures life and can do it better and quicker with a bigger caliber and bullet that is designed and intended for that animal.

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  8. #66
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    tg I will have to agree with u on that! Good debate!

  9. #67
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    I know plenty about ballistics and don't need to read anything more on the subject. I also do not agree that the heavier bullets are necessarily better. I would prefer to use the most accurate, even if it does happen to weigh 5 grains less.

    Here is an email someone posted on another site that is from a Barnes representative in reply to his request for a bullet recommendation for his 22-250:

    I would recommend that you use the 53 or 55 grain TSX with your twist. The 62 may not stabilize. We have many customers that use the 45 grain TSX’s on deer and antelope with great results, so the 53 and 55’s should work well. I am attaching our load data for the 22-250 which includes loads for the 53. You can use this data for both the 53 and 55’s. These two bullets are pretty much the same, just two popular weights. Thank you and let me know if you have any specific questions.

  10. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdan68 View Post
    #2 it would make the hunt more challenging, just as it would for someone choosing to use a bow and arrow, or a 30/30 open sighted rifle.
    You gotta try the 30-30

    Keystone 1, Over!

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  11. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Musket Man View Post
    You gotta try the 30-30
    Cool! That's awesome, I would try a 30/30 if I owned one. Actually my dad has a few in his safe, maybe I should borrow one!

  12. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdan68 View Post
    Cool! That's awesome, I would try a 30/30 if I owned one. Actually my dad has a few in his safe, maybe I should borrow one!

    That would certainly be a better choice than using a 223 with varmint loads just because they are accurate!

 

 

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