Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Bend, Orygun
    Posts
    483
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 131 Times in 98 Posts
    Congratulations
    1
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I zero at 200, get my clicks for 500 and 800 then make a yardage tape for my turret. In your case I would decide how far I want to shoot and base the zero off that. In any case, you'll need to verify the drops out to the max hash mark.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    The Golden State
    Posts
    1,374
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 73 Times in 73 Posts
    Congratulations
    3
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I zero at 200 with my 300 wby
    -NRA Life Member
    -Wild Sheep Foundation, <1 club

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Joliet, Il
    Posts
    171
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 29 Times in 29 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    225 because that's as far as my preferred gun range goes!!

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Kingwood, TX
    Posts
    1,746
    Thanks
    80
    Thanked 233 Times in 176 Posts
    Congratulations
    45
    Congratulated 30 Times in 3 Posts
    I tend to zero for MPBR even with a B&C reticle.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Auburn, Alabama
    Posts
    136
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
    Congratulations
    1
    Congratulated 9 Times in 3 Posts
    100 yard zero in the East, 200 yard zero in the West - that's my general rule of thumb.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    245
    Thanks
    60
    Thanked 35 Times in 32 Posts
    Congratulations
    6
    Congratulated 7 Times in 1 Post
    I ordered a zeiss with bdc z8 for my .300 wsm and they recommend a 200 yard zero for that caliber. With the z6 bdc they recommend a 100 yard zero. I would read owners manual, hopefully will help you out. This manual also says magnification doesn't effect accuracy 300 yard and under but above that there is an optimal setting of 12 power. Good luck.

  7. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts

    100 vs 200 yd zero

    Quote Originally Posted by Ltsheets View Post
    Hello everyone. I've got a fairly quick question. The other day I mounted my first BDC style scope on my 300wsm which I plan on using for most of my big game hunts out west. In the past, with standard duplex reticles, I zero my rifles at 200 to make shots out to 300 fairly easy with a very small amount of holdover. With this Meopta mcwhorter BDC reticle, I'm torn on whether to zero it at 100 or 200 yds. Thoughts?
    I always sight my rifles in for a 250 yard zero. That way 300 yards will not require any hold over. In the West, 300 yards will look like 150 or 200 yards if you're used to hunting the east and you won't be able to tell it's 300 yards without a rangefinder. Also, in the west, 300 yards may be the closest you can get -- however, you should always try and get as close as possible. The latest Barnes reloading book will give you trajectories for a 250 yard zero.

  8. #18
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    South West Montana
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 20 Times in 5 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    It really doesn't matter what range you site your rifle in with a bdc reticle 100 or 200 even 300 yards

    What does matter is that you take the time to go out and shoot at the distances you plan on using the reticle with your zero set at your preferred distance and log the info into a data book or reference chart that you can use when you go to the field.

    If you hunt in very similar conditions as you practice these type of reticles can be effective, however if you plan on sighting in at sea level and then traveling to Montana to hunt you will not be pleased with the results. Dramatic changes in environmental standards are going to play havoc with any generic drop reticle because one shoe does not fit all...

    Jordan@406

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    505
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 104 Times in 63 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Back East it's hard to find ranges with long distances. I sight in my .270 to be 3 inches high at 100 yards, which for my ammo is 0 at 250. Then I check it again at a range out West to make sure it's still on.

    I don't shoot over 400 so I really only have to think about wind drift and holding just over his back at 400. But actually, I'd much rather not to have to shoot that far. I'm prouder of a closer stalk than I am a long shot and I keep my odds of wounding very low.

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    "I've been to a town Del."
    Posts
    234
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 57 Times in 34 Posts
    Congratulations
    20
    Congratulated 17 Times in 3 Posts
    Good Morning Gentlemen,

    I have used the drop compensated reticles for seven years now and love them. Mine are all Leupolds and I follow their recommendations in the manual. My 257 Weatherby is sighted in dead on at three-hundred yards and the corresponding "crosshairs" in the Varmint Hunter reticle go out to 700 in theory. I've busted 1/2 gallon & gallon milk jugs out to those ranges with each crosshair. I like to do my killing much much closer though. I've never had a bullet go anywhere but where it was supposed to with this rifle set up this way. My 338-378, 7mm RUM, and wife's 270 win are all set up with a drop compensated reticle (either the VH or B&C from Leupold) they all put bullets where they are supposed to at the advertised ranges. I live, shoot, and hunt in Wyoming so my rifles are tuned for the atmospheric conditions in which they are used. When I do go back "East" to hunt in Michigan with family I take my M700 Titanium in .308 Win with a good old 1.5" high at 100 yds zero. I usually kill my bucks from a treestand or elevated position at around fifty paces. So, to answer the question... 200 or 300 yard "zero" for "out west" is what you want. Follow the directions in your manual and you will not be disappointed. Shoot your gun when you get to your destination to be certain and you should be golden!

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •