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  1. #1
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    Biologist Questions

    When any new hunters ask for starting advice, I always hear folks tell them to contact the biologist of the area. I personally have never done such a thing, just normally get boots on the ground and learn what I can when I can. With that being said, what are some questions you folks recommend asking game biologist when someone is hunting a new unit and/or state??

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    ive mett some real helpfull guys and some real stick up the but guys when it comes to bios. i onced asked a fish and game guy a question about the area he was over and this guy was clueless on the names i was giving him and he said those must be in another part of the state, so i grabed a reg off the counter and flipped to the map in there and showes him what i was talking about then he just played dumb. as you said, feet on the ground is best but sometimes its not that easy so we make a few calls to get help. ill ask how the pops are looking in certain areas, how feed is looking, what moisture was like in there during the summer. keep in mind that the bios that are actualy outdoorsmen themselves will have the most acurate info but also buddies that theyd rather share acurate info with.... one approach, if you dont mind the bars, hit up a bar close to interested area buy some rounds after making some buddies and start asking. also, my fav, call the local taxi guys, they are loaded with info, tell him you will be hunting nearby and ask if he has a cooler to store meat in if needed and that if you find your bigun that youd like him to do some work, he will be more then happy to point you in right direc to shoot something thatll put him to work. not his honey hole but he will take care of ya.

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  4. #3
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    If you have Mike Eastman's new book on elk he has a chapter on scouting a new area and includes a long list of questions about what to ask biologists, wardens, etc.

    In my own experience, some biologists are extremely helpful and others just seem really busy. The main thing is they know the conditions and the comings and goings of whatever herd you are asking about.

    The first they are usually willing to talk about. The second, some will tell you and others won't. It always helps to have a face-to-face and once they get to size you up they may open up a lot more.

    Ask about:
    Population trend
    Buck/doe ratio
    Recent winterkill or disease
    Percentage of mature animals
    What outfitters opearte in the area and if so, where
    Do they migrate, and if so, where and when
    How critical is the water situation
    Where would he hunt, assuming he doesn't hunt the area?
    For where the most hunting pressure is, you might have to ask the warden, but the biologist may know where to go to get away from pressure

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  6. #4
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    Don't forgot to stop by the taxidermists' shops once you narrow down an area. Most are very willing to help you out as to where the best success is and where the biggest heads come from.

    Many people don't know that Colorado employs hunt planners to help you decide where in the state to hunt, depending on you and how you like to hunt. I have found them to be pretty helpful. Just call the main Game and Fish number.

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  8. #5
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    I think the norm you will find is that some a great and others not so much.

    It's like any type of research for a new area. Ask question from anyone that might know the area. Boots on the ground and ask the bios on places to start looking then find YOUR spot. When your going in blind a bio can narrow the area down so your not wasting precious spotting time and energy. We pay their salaries and they should me willing to help when we ask.
    I don't Break the rules, I Modify them.

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    I've personally never had a good dealing with a bio, matter of fact I've never even received a return phone call after leaving messages. Wardens have been very helpful once they size you up and check you out. I've found that boots on the ground or even tires on the trails helps get familiar with areas and then narrow down the key areas.
    I do have to say my buddy last year did get fantastic info from a bio before his sheep hunt, he even called during the hunt to tell him more info. I just haven't been that lucky in my dealings, yet.

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    I've never had one not return my call and I've probably talked to 15-20 biologists. It may take them several days to call back because they may be in the field and I always call again if the first call was not returned after a few days.

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    I had a good exp last year in MT. The bio hunted the area, so he was a bit short on details.
    However he answered everything politely and accurately. (Later confirmed)
    Using Tapatalk

  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoshour View Post
    Don't forgot to stop by the taxidermists' shops once you narrow down an area. Most are very willing to help you out as to where the best success is and where the biggest heads come from.

    Many people don't know that Colorado employs hunt planners to help you decide where in the state to hunt, depending on you and how you like to hunt. I have found them to be pretty helpful. Just call the main Game and Fish number.
    i have hunted Colorado my whole life and never heard of a hunt planner for the division of wildlife or the new parks and wildlife. Where did you hear about this?

  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKC View Post
    i have hunted Colorado my whole life and never heard of a hunt planner for the division of wildlife or the new parks and wildlife. Where did you hear about this?
    Its on their web site. I cant say exactly how to find it but I have seen it and info on who to call for different areas.
    "Now two flags fly above my land that really sum up how I fee. One is the colors that fly high and proud The red, the white, the blue. The other one's got a rattlesnake With a simple statement made "Don't tread on me" is what it says and I'll take that to my grave. Because this is me. I'm proud to be American and strong in my beliefs. And I've said it before but I'll say it again 'Cause my family's always fought and died to save this land. And a country boy is all I'll ever be."

 

 

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