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  1. #11
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    Last year I was close to 45lbs for a 6 day hunt. I don't know that I can do much better than that AND be comfortable enough to last the full six days


    Eastmans' Staff Digital Media Coordinator

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottR View Post
    Something to remember guys, don't pack to achieve a certain weight. Pack the most efficient systems for the hunt on hand.


    Eastmans' Staff Digital Media Coordinator
    This is great advice! I am 46 and prefer to pack a little more weight for a little added comfort for this length of hunt and if need be rough it and spike out for a day or two.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottR View Post
    Something to remember guys, don't pack to achieve a certain weight. Pack the most efficient systems for the hunt on hand.


    Eastmans' Staff Digital Media Coordinator

    There is a lot of truth there Scott. Unfortunately, I believe that statement is a bit of a double edged sword. I agree with packing the most efficient gear, but I also believe a lot of folks use statements like that as a justification for packing more weight than they could.

    If a 50 lb gear list and a 35 lb gear list offer the same comfort, safety, and capability, then the hunter wearing the 35 lb pack will cover more ground in search of game, move faster, and be less tired day over day than the fellow lugging more weight.

    I don't think that gear makes a hunter better. I think knowledge, a positive attitude, a solid plan, reasoning ability, physical fitness, and persistence makes a better hunter. But gear can make that hunter more capable. Too much gear can weigh him down and sap his strength, and make him more and more sore each day.

    Here is a really good article on the reasoning and how-to of dropping weight from your pack.

    http://seekoutside.com/ultralight-hunting-kit-primer/

    The easiest way to drop weight is to reduce redundant items, then add multi-function items. After that you're attacking the big three of pack weight, shelter, sleeping, IN THAT ORDER. This makes up your base weight, and aside from weapon and optics this is where the majority of your weight will be.

    Packs are nearly always worn so weight reduction there matters more. Shelter is next as most folks can get by with a less luxurious shelter. Sleeping is the last place to cut weight simply because crawling into a good bag when you're wet and tired can prevent a miserable night. Still, sleeping bags under 2-3 lbs with a 5-20 degree bag are available but not cheap.

    The most effective way to cut weight is to get more backpacking experience. Over time you become more comfortable with the gear you have, and begin to realize that you have things you don't really need. Fear often drives us to carry more than we should, and that "I may need this" attitude fills a lot of packs.
    Paradox Packs
    Ultralight Hunting Backpacks

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  5. #14
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    I could probably loose a few lbs on certain Items but don't ever think I can get down to 35lbs for a 7-10 day hunt. I know you can go lighter on certain things but I also think you sacrifice some other things. I am all for lighter packs and have used some. While they were great at packing in at sub 60lbs packing out a much heavier load was a killer. I would rather have a heavier durable pack that rides, packs better over the rough country I hunt than a light pack that doesn't do well with heavy weight packing out. Could be I haven't found the right light weight pack but The pack I now have is a good compromise for what I do. I still would like to see a 35 lb pack list for 7-10 days I have never seen one.
    I don't think it is fear, being safe for the conditions at hand would be a better choice of words. Where I hunt the past few trips have ranged from the mid 60s to the teens so losing certain cloths or going to a lighter weight higher temp bag wont work. What might work in AZ for hunt might not work for a hunt in MT. I would say it would be easier to go in to lean and leave something needed behind than someone that might have a few extras and be a little more comfortable for adverse conditions.
    Last edited by 25contender; 06-24-2014 at 07:27 AM.

  6. #15
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    I know it does not get a lot of respect, but I purchasd the Cabelas Alaskan Pack (forget which model- top of the line last year for this Cabela brand). It feels comfy and weights at just 7 lbs and this includes the external frame. For the high quality (my opinion-its not cheap, moderately light, external meat hauling capability, detachable bag, rain fly, water bladder, etc, etc, it seems to be a great pack for 1/2 the price of other packs.

    Quote Originally Posted by 25contender View Post
    I could probably loose a few lbs on certain Items but don't ever think I can get down to 35lbs for a 7-10 day hunt. I know you can go lighter on certain things but I also think you sacrifice some other things. I am all for lighter packs and have used some. While they were great at packing in at sub 60lbs packing out a much heavier load was a killer. I would rather have a heavier durable pack that rides, packs better over the rough country I hunt than a light pack that doesn't do well with heavy weight packing out. Could be I haven't found the right light weight pack but The pack I now have is a good compromise for what I do. I still would like to see a 35 lb pack list for 7-10 days I have never seen one.
    I don't think it is fear, being safe for the conditions at hand would be a better choice of words. Where I hunt the past few trips have ranged from the mid 60s to the teens so losing certain cloths or going to a lighter weight higher temp bag wont work. What might work in AZ for hunt might not work for a hunt in MT. I would say it would be easier to go in to lean and leave something needed behind than someone that might have a few extras and be a little more comfortable for adverse conditions.

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  8. #16
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    I have used one they are great packs. My present pack with all the accessories weighs in at 7.4lbs. My last pack with all the extras weighed in at 9.5lbs. I am very comfortable with the new pack. I have been on about 10 full pack + 10 treks with it and it packs very well. I have done a few treks with well over that weight and am very impressed with how it performs compare to my past packs.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bonecollector View Post
    I know it does not get a lot of respect, but I purchasd the Cabelas Alaskan Pack (forget which model- top of the line last year for this Cabela brand). It feels comfy and weights at just 7 lbs and this includes the external frame. For the high quality (my opinion-its not cheap, moderately light, external meat hauling capability, detachable bag, rain fly, water bladder, etc, etc, it seems to be a great pack for 1/2 the price of other packs.

  9. #17
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    Here is my list. I've got ideas on where I can shave a few pounds (sleeping bag, tripod, and rain gear), but I would like to shave 10-15 and get me closer to 50. Maybe not possible as I am including water weight, gun,......everything. I have a few more items to include weights of once I purchase them and they arrive thus a couple items with no weights listed.

    This is my 7 day list for a 1st season rifle hunt in Colorado.

    Base Pack - total = 158.5 oz
    3L bladder w/ water - 81.5
    Stone Glacier pack w/ accessories - 77.0

    Shelter & Sleeping - total = 152.8 oz
    sleeping bag - 68.3
    sleeping pad - 28.0
    BA Copper Spur 2p tent, stakes, footprint, etc - 56.5

    Clothing - total = 188.4 oz
    facemask & neck warmer - 3.2
    heavy gloves - 3.4
    heavy hat - 4.6
    Kuiu Guide pant - 18.9
    Core 4 Element Pivot Shirt - 13.1
    UA light beanie hat - 1.4
    Patagonia R1 shirt - 12.8
    Patagonia R1 pant - 11.7
    First Lite Uncompahgre - 19.8
    rain jacket - 33.9
    rain pant - 29.5
    orange vest - 9.2
    wool base layer bottom - 6.3
    wool base layer top - 8.3
    wool socks (4 pr) - 8.9
    wool boxers (1 pr) - 3.4

    Optics - total = 134.5 oz
    binoculars - 27.5
    spotting scope - 51.5
    rangefinder - 7.3
    digital camera - 6.9
    tripod - ???? on order

    Kill Kit - total = 27.9 oz
    60' para cord - 3.0
    cleaning gloves - 0.8
    flagging tape - 2.6
    Caribou Wapiti bags - 18.0
    Havalon Piranha w/ blades - 3.4
    pen - 0.1

    Accessories - total = 228.9 oz
    2L bladder for flavored drink - 6.0
    alarm clock - 3.4
    cell charger - 6.9
    camp stove, fuel, utensils, pot - 28.4
    compass - 0.7
    12 extra batteries - 6.0
    garbage bag (heavy duty) - 4.8
    GPS - 7.4
    gun w/ ammo - 153.1
    headlight - 3.2
    calls - 7.2
    wind indicator dust - 0.9
    10 zip ties - 0.7

    Survival/Toiletries - total = 53.8
    stuff sack - 1.0
    firestarter - 2.2
    first aid kit - 7.8
    water purifier tablets - 2.2
    lighter - 1.0
    super glue - 0.2
    waterproof matches - 1.5
    chapstick - 0.3
    deodorant - 4.0
    toilet paper - 3.0
    toothbrush and tooothpaste - 3.7
    water filter - 18.8
    12 wipes - 8.1

    Food - total = 179.9
    net 6 oz jerky - 6.8
    net 6 oz bags of tuna - 40.8
    cliff bars 2/day - 34.4
    instant oatmeal - 11.1
    Mountain House meals - 40.9
    gallon ziploc bags - 2.5
    poptarts - 27.2
    gum - 1.1
    propel drink mix - 0.7
    trail mix - 14.4

    Grand Total Weight = 1037.0 oz = 64.8 lbs

    On Person
    ball cap
    belt
    boots
    camo pants
    camo shirt
    light facemask
    light gloves
    leatherman
    wallet/license
    sunglasses
    watch
    wool boxers
    wool socks

  10. #18
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    W2H one thing I noticed right away I use my GPS as a clock it also has a alarm. I dont carry a phone as there is zero signal where I go. Also if you are carrying a phone it has a alarm clock.

  11. #19
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    My list is pretty much like everyone else's, but I always bring eye drops, chapstick, and some of that anti-itch/chaffing powder(useful for your feet and you-know-where). Little things weight wise, but make the trip more enjoyable for me. Sometimes I'll even bring a small book.

 

 

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