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  1. #1
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    SKIN ON or SKIN OFF

    This took on a different question than the title. Maybe it should be skin on, skin off, or skin off and bagged?

    This is more of a meat care and processing question but the cooking thread is in need of some action and lets face it, good deer or elk steaks start with proper care right off the bat.

    So I have seen a lot of pics of skinned out quarters without bags. I always bag everything even for a short trip.
    I even use bags when hanging in a cooler although I know that it is not needed.

    So tell me am I missing something.
    For folks that leave quarters unbagged are you wiping the them down with vinegar water or something to remove anything unwanted and get a nice crust?
    Last edited by OregonJim; 07-04-2014 at 06:49 PM.
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  2. #2
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    I've never used bags, I just go gutless (long before it was popular) and skin the quarters out, and find a nearby tree or something, form a loop of rope on the leg and hang it off a limb where the meat gets good air circulation and can form a dry skin. I pack tenderloins and backstraps out first. Then I get the rest of meat out as quickly as I can. I've never had an issue with spoilage or bad tasting meat.
    Grand Slam #1005 + 2: Dall (1986 Yukon), Fannin/Stone (1987 Yukon), Bighorn (1988 Colorado Unit S-26), Stone (1995 British Columbia), Desert (2001 Nevada Unit 161), Bighorn (2009 Wyoming Unit 5)

  3. #3
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    I use the bags until they are hanging in my garage, then I pull them off.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Umpqua Hunter View Post
    I've never used bags, I just go gutless (long before it was popular) and skin the quarters out, and find a nearby tree or something, form a loop of rope on the leg and hang it off a limb where the meat gets good air circulation and can form a dry skin. I pack tenderloins and backstraps out first. Then I get the rest of meat out as quickly as I can. I've never had an issue with spoilage or bad tasting meat.
    Umpqua, have you ever lost meat due to flys or do you just trim off eggs (if you get them)?
    I just can't get past giving unfettered access.

    The only time i went w/o game bags I had a pretty bad infestation and I got most with a vinegar & water wipe but I still ended up losing some meat.
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  5. #5
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    I always use bags to keep fly's off.

  6. #6
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    Bags here to keep the fly's and yellow-jackets off for me

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by OregonJim View Post
    Umpqua, have you ever lost meat due to flys or do you just trim off eggs (if you get them)?
    I just can't get past giving unfettered access.

    The only time i went w/o game bags I had a pretty bad infestation and I got most with a vinegar & water wipe but I still ended up losing some meat.
    You are making me think about this. I cannot remember lost meat due to flies. My dad taught me to move meat fast and get it chilled. I also don't leave meat hanging in camp except overnight. It is getting packed on ice or taken to a locker at the earliest possible time. I always have a locker located in advance, or large ice chests full of ice with me.

    Most deer and elk we've taken on our own are October and November animals, but several weren't. Most of the meat has been gotten out of the field in a few hours. August and September antelope have been brought out whole and dressed and go right on ice.

    You do have me thinking bags would probably be the ticket for this year's September elk hunt though since there is a very good chance it could be warm and we kill a ways from the road.

    P.S. One thing I do is I "stage" the meat for the pack out usually well away from the blood and mess of the kill site (like 100 yards).
    Last edited by Umpqua Hunter; 07-05-2014 at 12:14 PM.
    Grand Slam #1005 + 2: Dall (1986 Yukon), Fannin/Stone (1987 Yukon), Bighorn (1988 Colorado Unit S-26), Stone (1995 British Columbia), Desert (2001 Nevada Unit 161), Bighorn (2009 Wyoming Unit 5)

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  9. #8
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    Like said earlier, it is nice to hang skun quarters without bags until the outside dries, then bag em'. That's how I prefer to do it.
    Live to hunt, hunt to live.

  10. #9
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    You'll be fine on the Sept hunt. Just hang them in the shade like you do and on the rear quarters, separate the two large muscles along the membranes, down to the bone to help them cool.

  11. #10
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    I'll skin and bag while transporting until back home, otherwise they're exposed to air. I like the bags in the field for the simple fact that they help keep the meat cleaner while handling. As far as knocking an elk down in September goes, as long as you get it quartered and aired in the shade, splitting the muscles on the back end like WB suggested will help cool down, in an expeditious manner, you'll be fine. If it's abnormally warm, there's measures one can take like bagging (in plastic) and submerging in a creek.

 

 

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