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  1. #1
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    Archery Out West?

    how far are archers routinely taking game at out west?
    and on what animals?

    someone recently told me to try to be ready to shoot 100yds at an antelope??

    I could see 60yds, but 100yds seems pretty far, especially on an antelope, plus add wind out west... and just holding on 100ds.

    Also then what do you have a 9pin sight? that too seems crazy.

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  3. #2
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    I live in AZ and have not taken anything with a bow YET(just getting started). Every year though, after reading all of the local stories, I see a whole lot of 60-80 yd. kills. Don't get me wrong there are plenty of guys that kill at shorter distances, but a lot are far shots. Guy I know killed his coues at 134 yds this past january. Deer dropped in about 10 seconds. So, yes, I would be ready for a long shot like that. If you feel uncomfortable taking that long of a shot, then don't. I would for sure practice 100 yard shots though. It will make 60 seem a lot easier. Out here it is tough, rugged, and unforgiving country. The mountains will kick your butt. If you get an opportunity at a good animal that is 60-80 out and you aren't ready for that shot, there is a good chance you will be kicking yourself in the butt for not preparing, haha. The long shots are especially important with spot and stalk hunting. Getting under 60 yards might just not be possible without blowing an opportunity.

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    134 yards?? I hope the deer didn't walk 2 steps in the 2 seconds it would take the arrow to get there.
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  6. #4
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    Most of the time when hunting antelope, you're going to be dealing with some sort of wind, not breeze, wind. Even a 50-60 yard shot on an antelope in the conditions that you typically encounter will be extremely difficult.

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  8. #5
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    I practice and make sure I am confident to hit whatever I aim at out to 80 yards. I have a single pin Hogg father so I dial to the yardage if I have to. But I also set it at 40 and know how how low to aim at 20 and 30, and will practice how high at 50-60.
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    Quote Originally Posted by velvetfvr View Post
    I practice and make sure I am confident to hit whatever I aim at out to 80 yards.
    I can't even imagine flinging an arrow at something 80 yards away! To me, 40 yards is a long way's. Not that there's anything necessarily wrong with it as long as your confident in your shooting at that distance. Then again I'm not the archer that some guy's are. I still think archery should be an up close and personal game. Anything past 50 yards to me is too far... So to the OP, I hunt out west with archery gear and won't be taking any shots over 50 yards. I'm probably in the minority anymore?

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  11. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoHiCntry View Post
    I can't even imagine flinging an arrow at something 80 yards away! To me, 40 yards is a long way's. Not that there's anything necessarily wrong with it as long as your confident in your shooting at that distance. Then again I'm not the archer that some guy's are. I still think archery should be an up close and personal game. Anything past 50 yards to me is too far... So to the OP, I hunt out west with archery gear and won't be taking any shots over 50 yards. I'm probably in the minority anymore?
    I wouldn't say you are in the minority, but range you shoot an animal at is mostly what you can do accurately and confidently. Archery is trying to get as close as possible, but sometimes 80 yards is close and as close as you can get. 40 yards out hunting feels like 20 to me and looks that way.

    80 yards seems like a long distance and things can go wrong, but an animal can still move enough at 20 to have the same problem. I limited myself to 40 one year, and I regret it. I had an antelope buck perfectly broadside, no clue I was there at 50 and couldn't get closer. Never took the shot. Also being able to hit a spot at 80 will make the close shots seem so easy.
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  14. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoHiCntry View Post
    I can't even imagine flinging an arrow at something 80 yards away! To me, 40 yards is a long way's. Not that there's anything necessarily wrong with it as long as your confident in your shooting at that distance. Then again I'm not the archer that some guy's are. I still think archery should be an up close and personal game. Anything past 50 yards to me is too far... So to the OP, I hunt out west with archery gear and won't be taking any shots over 50 yards. I'm probably in the minority anymore?
    Fortunately but unfortunately. Modern compound bows have evolved into longer distances. Faster arrows, sliding sights and the odds of drawing have increased substantially when putting in for tags. I think "archery" will be much more divided in the coming years. There will be the longbow guys that say if it ain't within 20 it ain't archery. Then there will be the super speed guys that say they like to watch their arrow fall into the animal. As long as practice is involved I think there is much skill in both worlds. But just like the muzzleloader guys frown on the long distance adjustable turret guys. It's bound to happen. I like to play with all weaponry and none is easier then the other. Just different. When hunting western game you don't really have an average per say. You build a comfort zone and stick with it. Regardless how close or far it may be. You can't practice with primal adrenaline. And the moment you attempt to draw back on something out of your comfort zone your heart and mind answer the question for you. I remember letting down my bow after holding on vitals for a solid minute with a buck at 40 yards. I just didn't feel right about the shot and had to pass. The following year 40 yards was certainly a new comfort zone.
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  16. #9
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    100% different with everybody. Most of the places I am hunting at most times and eighty yard shot can expect up to six inches of drift in the ( less than calm wind) out west. There is so many variables... Wind. Slope. Vegetation. Animal. Broadside. Animal calm? Animal on alert. Your experience. Your rangefinder. Your heart rate after the mile and half stalk. Are you on slope. Are your standing. On rocks. Are you shooting from your knees. 5 pin sight. Slider. There's just a start. Haha. The real answer is. There is nobody else that shoots the same way you do. Just be comfortable with your equipment and justify your shots. You know in your head if you can make the shot!! Best of luck brother. It's a battle all archers and even rifleman face through a lifetime of hunting!

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  18. #10
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    I have to credit Work2hunt for this question as he came up with it on a different thread but I think it is relevant here and I want to see as much feed back on it as possible:

    At what point are your groups tight enought at 100 yds to say "okay, good enough, I can take a shot at 80," or whatever that max range might be.

    And on a related note, at point do you kick yourself for not taking that 50-80 yd shot versus kicking yourself for wounding an animal?

    Being new to archery, these kinds of posts are just priceless!

 

 

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