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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by micropterus79 View Post
    I have to credit Work2hunt for this question as he came up with it on a different thread but I think it is relevant here and I want to see as much feed back on it as possible:

    At what point are your groups tight enought at 100 yds to say "okay, good enough, I can take a shot at 80," or whatever that max range might be.

    And on a related note, at point do you kick yourself for not taking that 50-80 yd shot versus kicking yourself for wounding an animal?

    Being new to archery, these kinds of posts are just priceless!
    I make sure that when I release the arrow from my hinge release that it hits where my pin is holding at that spot. If I can keep doing that, then I am confident I can shoot at that range. But shooting long range I won't do everyday. Like mentioned above by Casey, how is my float, what is the animal doing, how windy is it etc. If any variable that I am not comfortable with, I won't take a shot at long range.

    I kind of like to take what football teams do, especially the patriots. They practice situational football. I practice situational archery. Though I should have said, I won't shoot up to 80 given any type of situation. I make a call based on the situation what I am comfortable with. High winds I may not shoot past 30, calm, no breeze, animal calm then I am feeling good with an 80 yard shot at my max range.

    I also practice with my gear on and in different positions. I try to recreate every hunting emotion I have felt in practice. I haven't found a buck fever one yet but I will go do cardio by riding a bike for 34 minutes (7+ miles) at the highest rate I can do. Then I will go grab my bow, and take 1 shot at 20 or 30 yards (farthest in my yard) and make sure it is perfect. This simulates shooting with a thumping heart and burning legs.
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  3. #12
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    Good advice right here.


    Quote Originally Posted by velvetfvr View Post
    I make sure that when I release the arrow from my hinge release that it hits where my pin is holding at that spot. If I can keep doing that, then I am confident I can shoot at that range. But shooting long range I won't do everyday. Like mentioned above by Casey, how is my float, what is the animal doing, how windy is it etc. If any variable that I am not comfortable with, I won't take a shot at long range.

    I kind of like to take what football teams do, especially the patriots. They practice situational football. I practice situational archery. Though I should have said, I won't shoot up to 80 given any type of situation. I make a call based on the situation what I am comfortable with. High winds I may not shoot past 30, calm, no breeze, animal calm then I am feeling good with an 80 yard shot at my max range.

    I also practice with my gear on and in different positions. I try to recreate every hunting emotion I have felt in practice. I haven't found a buck fever one yet but I will go do cardio by riding a bike for 34 minutes (7+ miles) at the highest rate I can do. Then I will go grab my bow, and take 1 shot at 20 or 30 yards (farthest in my yard) and make sure it is perfect. This simulates shooting with a thumping heart and burning legs.

  4. #13
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    IMHO whether it's with a bow or a rifle, if the distance is so far that the animal can take a step in the time the arrow/bullet gets there, it's too dang far to be shooting at a living animal whether you can hit the ten ring on a still target every time or not! 134 yards with a bow, especially at a tiny Coues deer IMHO is absolutely ridiculous and not etchical whether he happened to kill that one or not!
    Last edited by Topgun 30-06; 07-16-2014 at 07:32 AM.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Topgun 30-06 View Post
    IMHO whether it's with a bow or a rifle, if the distance is so far that the animal can take a step in the time the arrow/bullet gets there, it's too dang far to be shooting at a living animal whether you can hit the ten ring on a still target every time or not!
    That would be almost any distance with a bow... Or a rifle at any yardage over 200 yards. It is the hunters responsibility to judge the animals mood and potential reaction before taking any shot. While I respect your opinion, I don't believe everyone should be restricted to gun hunting at short yardages. I am comfortable with my abilities and my years of experience have taught me when a shot is right to take or not.

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  7. #15
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    I just shoot a Rage head, it doesn't matter how far or close he is , it will kill it if you hit it...right?

    Joking of course! Like said before, archery to me is all about getting close (so is turkey hunting) so here in the South East I do everything possible to get them within 20 yards. I have not hunted archery out West yet, but no way I would ever consider anything over 40 yards...my equipment and capabilities are just not there. I do like to practice at longer distances as I feel it makes me better at the "shorter" distance.

    But if you have to ask the question then I would have to question your logic...

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  9. #16
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    I've never kicked myself for not taking a shot, with any weapon. I have kicked myself for taking a shot and loosing an animal though.
    Last edited by Timberstalker; 07-16-2014 at 08:26 AM.

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  11. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Topgun 30-06 View Post
    IMHO whether it's with a bow or a rifle, if the distance is so far that the animal can take a step in the time the arrow/bullet gets there, it's too dang far to be shooting at a living animal whether you can hit the ten ring on a still target every time or not! 134 yards with a bow, especially at a tiny Coues deer IMHO is absolutely ridiculous and not etchical whether he happened to kill that one or not!
    Top gun, a animal can move just as much at 20 yards as a 100 yards while hunting with archery tackle. The buck I shot last year was at 32 yards, I was shooting 280-290fps with a 463 grain arrow, he had enough time to hear my bow go off, and go just barely quartering away to a steep quartering away angle and move one step. The shot ended up being at least a foot from where I was aiming when I squeezed the release to fire.
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  13. #18
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    I love shooting my bow at long range, modern equipment makes a 100 yard shot a very makable proposition. Having said that, I am much more likely to scare an animal away trying to get inside of 50 yards, than I am likely to take an 80 yard shot. The only animals that I have shot over 70 yards have been follow ups where the animal wasn't down yet. I do think that is reason enough to practice at longer yardages. I have had two different occaisions where the ability to put another arrow into the animal at long range kept me from possibly losing it. I agree with what was said about regretting a shot, even though it happens, losing an animal ruins a hunt for me.

  14. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by velvetfvr View Post
    Top gun, a animal can move just as much at 20 yards as a 100 yards while hunting with archery tackle. The buck I shot last year was at 32 yards, I was shooting 280-290fps with a 463 grain arrow, he had enough time to hear my bow go off, and go just barely quartering away to a steep quartering away angle and move one step. The shot ended up being at least a foot from where I was aiming when I squeezed the release to fire.
    This is absolutely the truth. I think the idea of situational shot calling is critical to being an ethical bowhunter. It takes years of observing the behavior of the animals you are hunting to get a feel for how they will react to a shot.

    As for ranges, I think it is up to the individual, but my gut feeling is that shooting much beyond 80yds is in most cases a bad idea. I practice out to 100, but limit myself in a hunting environment to 70 yds for deer and antelope and 60 for elk (penetration is the concern here). Having said this there are situations where I wouldn't take a shot past 40 due to wind, terrain, position, animal behavior.

    I have 30-40 archery kills, and have failed to recovered two animals in 24 years of bowhunting, but I am certain that if I had taken more of the questionable shots at longer ranges that number would spike dramatically.

    To be an ethical hunter requires significant discipline, restraint, and judgement to ensure you have the will power to pass on the shots you shouldn't take and commit to the appropriate amount of time to prepare to ensure that when you do commit to a shot you are prepared. I believe this is magnified with archery equipment.

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  16. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnhunter View Post
    This is absolutely the truth. I think the idea of situational shot calling is critical to being an ethical bowhunter. It takes years of observing the behavior of the animals you are hunting to get a feel for how they will react to a shot.

    As for ranges, I think it is up to the individual, but my gut feeling is that shooting much beyond 80yds is in most cases a bad idea. I practice out to 100, but limit myself in a hunting environment to 70 yds for deer and antelope and 60 for elk (penetration is the concern here). Having said this there are situations where I wouldn't take a shot past 40 due to wind, terrain, position, animal behavior.

    I have 30-40 archery kills, and have failed to recovered two animals in 24 years of bowhunting, but I am certain that if I had taken more of the questionable shots at longer ranges that number would spike dramatically.

    To be an ethical hunter requires significant discipline, restraint, and judgement to ensure you have the will power to pass on the shots you shouldn't take and commit to the appropriate amount of time to prepare to ensure that when you do commit to a shot you are prepared. I believe this is magnified with archery equipment.
    Yep situational archery. Each situation will usually have its own variables and we have to make that choice. 80 is my max comfort range, but that is when the situation fits what I am comfortable with.
    2013 spyder turbo, 70lbs black out and 2013 pse omen max 60# stormy hardwoods green
    Limbdriver Pro V, Tight spot quiver, Single pin Hogg Father, Fuse carbon blade.
    Scott longhorn 3, Easton FMJ's

    AKA: Velvet Feather

 

 

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