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  1. #1
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    Muzzle velocity question

    So, i have been working up a load for my 30/06 for elk using 180gr partitions. I have them grouping well right now at just below 2600 fps according to the loading data. However, I noticed that most factory ammo with this bulket and weight is at 2700 fps. Will this be a problem? Should I work up some faster loads? I do not plan on shooting much past 300 yards because that is my comfort zone. Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Jeremy

  2. #2
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    Speed is fine but accuracy is final. I would not worry about your muzzle velocity and would happily go elk hunting. For what you describe 2600 fps is absolutely going to work very well. Now that being said in loading and working up new loads a chronograph sure is nice and does quite a lot in load work. It shows you how consistent your load is, what the true muzzle velocity is, and can warn you when a load might be approaching the area where it is a little bit on the warm side.

    Good luck hunting and I hope the elk co-operate this fall.
    David
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  3. #3
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    Within reason, I go with accuracy before speed. A fast traveling bullet that misses counts as a miss.

    A very dear friend of mine who hunted everything with a 7MM Rem Mag told me many seasons past that MM stood for mighty miss, the point being that velocity is useless if a hunter can't put a bullet where it needs to go.

    My Sako 7MM Rem Mag shoots most accurately the faster bullets travel. I have a Nosler 150 grain load at better than 3200 FPS (chrono'd) using IMR-4350, and it will shoot ragged one hole groups. I took this load straight from Nosler's manual. I've loaded 160 Partitions using data taken from many decades' old sources using H-4831. It shoots far better than Partitions ought. I've chrono'd this load at better than 3100 FPS.

    BTW, I don't think any animal is going to know the difference between 2600 FPS & 2700 FPS.

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    Every rifle is different. When you find what it likes and your groups stay sub moa, then stick with it, no matter what the velocity is.

    I use a chronograph on all my load development, takes out all the guesswork. Velocities published in loading manuals are only guidelines and your load/rifle combination can (and probably will) be different.

    You say that they group well at 2600 fps, have you worked up any faster loads that are closer to factory? Sometimes faster loads works well too, again depends on the rifle. My 30-06 likes faster loads. It is an old, 1927 vintage US Springfield that has been sporterized and I have shot since 1953. I still get sub moa groups. I shoot 150 gr bullets at 3200 fps that make a clover leaf hole that is usually about .60 center to center dia at 100 yds. When I slow it down the groups grow.

    If you are getting great groups with that load and you are satisfied, then shoot it!!
    Colorado Cowboy
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    Thank you all very much. I will experiment with faster, just not sure if I will have the time now that school is starting up. What is your process for working up a load? Just want to see what everyone else does.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jerm8352 View Post
    Thank you all very much. I will experiment with faster, just not sure if I will have the time now that school is starting up. What is your process for working up a load? Just want to see what everyone else does.
    When I am starting from scratch, I usually take a midrange load from my manual and work my way up in .5 gr increments. I load 3 and group them at 100 yards. Once Iv'e found the load I like, I'll move out to 200 & 300 at least. I will also be chronographing the loads looking for deviation spreads.
    Colorado Cowboy
    Cowboy Action Shooter; Endowment Life Member-NRA
    The Original Rocket Scientist-Retired
    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
    Aldous Huxley

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    Thank you. I was an idiot and loaded up way too much of a few loads before shooting them. Now I have to decide whether to just shoot through them or tear them apart and reload!

 

 

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