Page 14 of 26 FirstFirst ... 4121314151624 ... LastLast
Results 131 to 140 of 257
  1. #131
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    You seem to have a strong opinion about land management in Wyoming, so let me ask you a question: How much experience do you have with Wyoming State Government?

  2. #132
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    NW Nebraska
    Posts
    140
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 20 Times in 18 Posts
    Congratulations
    13
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by libidilatimmy View Post
    http://onanypc.com/statelandaccess/#

    This link will give you a visual of what land is "owned" by the State. Sure, just shy of four million acres sounds like a lot of land, but in the grand scope of what we're discussing, it's not that much. Off of that link, the Forest Service, BLM, and State control 30%, 58%, and 12% of the public land respectively. Just to reiterate what I said previously, the State does not "actively" manage a large portion of what they own. Most of their land is managed by private entities in the agricultural or energy industry whom hold the leases on those respective parcels. I don't think that increasing the amount of land a State has to manage by 800% is a viable solution.
    People continue to say that states can't manage land and will sell off the land if it is transferred from the federal government. The problem is the sates are already managing millions of acres of land and have not sold off large pieces to balance budgets. The state actually spends a lot of money opening up private land for hunting with programs like WIHA so it would appear the states like Wyoming actually spend money to increase the amount of huntable land which is completely opposite of what people are saying will happen.

    Obviously if transferred to the state additional money would need to be given to them to manage the land but I think there would be some significant savings compared to our current system which is extremely inefficient. The amount of people and $ the federal government uses to manage land is ridiculous.

    I enjoy a good debate and if you can come up with examples of states selling off large pieces of land to help budgets you would have a really good point. You would also have a really good point if the states did not manage any large pieces of land, but since they own millions of acres that really does not apply either.

  3. #133
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    My last post was directed at okielite...sorry still try to figure out how to post a response to a previous post.

  4. #134
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    NW Nebraska
    Posts
    140
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 20 Times in 18 Posts
    Congratulations
    13
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by highplainsdrifter View Post
    You seem to have a strong opinion about land management in Wyoming, so let me ask you a question: How much experience do you have with Wyoming State Government?
    I'll answer your question once answer mine from post #129.

  5. #135
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    NW Nebraska
    Posts
    140
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 20 Times in 18 Posts
    Congratulations
    13
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by highplainsdrifter View Post
    My last post was directed at okielite...sorry still try to figure out how to post a response to a previous post.
    Go to the previous post and click (reply with quote)

  6. #136
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    644
    Thanks
    129
    Thanked 185 Times in 149 Posts
    Congratulations
    115
    Congratulated 5 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by okielite View Post
    I enjoy a good debate and if you can come up with examples of states selling off large pieces of land to help budgets you would have a really good point. You would also have a really good point if the states did not manage any large pieces of land, but since they own millions of acres that really does not apply either.
    Wyoming probably isn't the best example since the State government seems to be more fiscally responsible than other states and they really don't manage any "large" pieces of land since a large majority of their acreage is non-contiguous. However, I do know the state of Texas auctions land off on an annual or bi-annual basis.

    http://www.glo.texas.gov/what-we-do/...ale/index.html

  7. #137
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Allegan, MI
    Posts
    1,076
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 242 Times in 198 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by okielite View Post
    Ok. how many times in those 30 years did you see large pieces of state land being sold off to help balance the budget? Can you provide a link to an example?
    If you knew half as much as you think you do, you'd know the current Wyoming statutes expressly forbid the sale of the public land by the State Land Board without going through a ton of red tape that at the present time would never fly if/when it went before the State Legislature! Also, as was stated in more than one previous post, the land we're talking about is not in large tracts that would come close to tracts of BLM or NF lands. Take a look at the maps to see how things are spread out all over the state. You won't see the shade of blue that designates state lands in very big tracts like you do the yellow for BLM and green for NF lands.

  8. #138
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Gillette, WY
    Posts
    438
    Thanks
    351
    Thanked 109 Times in 96 Posts
    Congratulations
    80
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I agree with a lot of what libidilatimmy has said. I was doing the math while he was posting, and if you take out Yellowstone, Grand Teton and the Wind River Indian Reservation, its about 600%. That is a huge boost of lands that need managed and one of the simplest solutions is selling some off. Its hard to find good employees and adding 6x the number of employees would be a lot. Lib. is also right that most of the state lands (6% of total state lands) are trust lands (school sections) which are 1 in every 36 section I think which is about 3%, so 1/2 of Wyoming state lands are stuck right in the middle of something else, either BLM or private. The other 3% is probably in a similar situation. The majority of these trust lands are set up to get mineral royalties, so they are really managed by someone else. Wyoming is not set up to take over federal land management. Maybe if it was a baby step process that was funded by mineral royalties, it might work, I don't know. Sometimes it is frustrating to have federal lands that are subject to policies made by people who don't seem to have a good handle on the multi-use that these lands could have, and I think were originally supposed to have, but I think water rights are a good example of why the federal goverment should have a say in managing these lands. If Wyoming were to manage the water that starts in our mountains and what not, the reservoirs would probably always be full and we would have bumper hay crops, but Nebraska would suffer for it, if only because they would have to pay more for it, so we would have to pay more for corn. Utah and California and Colorado couldn't grow as much fruit, so I would have scurvy, it would be a bad deal. Montana wheat would even suffer because the Yellowstone has roots in Wyoming, too. I am getting out there again, I had better call it good, but I agree there have been some good points.

  9. #139
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Allegan, MI
    Posts
    1,076
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 242 Times in 198 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 2 Times in 2 Posts
    If you click on that Texas link and go from Region to Region, you'll see a lot of the land up for sale is private property and there is very little acerage of substance for sale in the entire state.

  10. #140
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    NW Nebraska
    Posts
    140
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 20 Times in 18 Posts
    Congratulations
    13
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by libidilatimmy View Post
    Wyoming probably isn't the best example since the State government seems to be more fiscally responsible than other states and they really don't manage any "large" pieces of land since a large majority of their acreage is non-contiguous. However, I do know the state of Texas auctions land off on an annual or bi-annual basis.

    http://www.glo.texas.gov/what-we-do/...ale/index.html
    Wyoming has large pieces of state land. I've hunted on one really nice piece of property just north of Manville. Not to mention places like Glendo st park or Curt Gowdy.

    I'm not sure Texas selling off small pieces of state land is quite the crisis that people are describing happening if the federal lands are transferred to the state. I also doubt that land that is being sold is really used for hunting or public recreation as most of those pieces are really small some even measured in square feet.

    A few examples of states managing large pieces of land include Ft Robinson St park in Nebraska. 22k acres of land that used to be federal owned military base but was transferred to the state. It's used as a tourist attraction and also for outdoor recreation such as hunting. They also have a buffalo pasture. Beautiful place that the state does a great job managing.

    Here is a piece of state land in Oklahoma, about 20k acres, Packsaddle WMA. Used to quail hunt there as a kid. Looks like they do a pretty good job of managing it for wildlife and outdoor recreation.
    Description of Wildlife Management Practices:
    Management efforts focus on producing native cover plants and wildlife foods such as ragweed and sunflower, although some small agricultural food plots are planted annually. Wildlife watering facilities have been installed, including windmills, water guzzlers, and small ponds. Cattle grazing is used to increase quail food abundance and improve brood habitat. Vehicle access is limited with few interior roads open to the public.

    Camping and Facilities:
    Nine designated primitive camping areas are located on the area. Both lodging and restaurants are available 17 miles north in Arnett and 22 miles south in Cheyenne.

    No shooting range available.

    Fishing Opportunities:
    Fishing opportunities exist at Lake Lloyd Vincent 30 miles northwest and Black Kettle Lake 15 miles south. There are no fishing opportunities at Packsaddle WMA

    So obviously States have proven that they can indeed manage large pieces of land for public use including hunting.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •