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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizz View Post
    Bnunley,

    Read Teddy Roosevelt's story; [I]An Elk Hunt at Two Ocean Pass. [I]

    Link provided

    http://www.theodorerooseveltcenter.o...?libID=o286523

    Pretty fair assessment of what you have to look forward to only with game laws and Grizzlies instead of "Indians"

    Have FUN!
    Tough reading so I scrolled down the google page to the PDF version. This was my first time reading this- can't believe how much meat was wasted. Very good read though- It was very interesting. Thanks for posting.

  2. #12
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    The hunt will be whatever you want it to be. If you tell yer guides you want to hunt hard from sun up to sun down, expect to hunt yer azz off. If you want to take it easy, most guides will accommodate you. I was on a guided elk hunt and we had a an elderly guy in camp with his son from back east. The elderly guy told his guide right from the get go, we don't get off the horses except to shoot or glass. They both ended up with decent 5 pt's. Another guy in his 70's on a Thorofare hunt sat on a rock with his guide for 3 - 4 days. He eventually shot a small 5 pt. You'll probably be asked about your expectations and how hard you want to hunt. Be prepared to give an answer...

  3. #13
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    It was a different time... I was thinking about wasted meat the first time I read it too.

  4. #14
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    Bnunley, prepare to see just how different hunting in Wyoming is. Expect big temp swings. I've had 25 degrees in the morning and 75 degrees in the same afternoon. Unless you are hunting with the owner/outfitter, the guide will probably either be more of a cowboy/horseman or an outdoorsman. Seldom will they be both.

    Get good at mounting and un mounting your horse and getting the rifle out of the scabbard. Don't put the rifle in the scabbard with a shell in the chamber EVER. Don't wrap the reins or lead rope around your hand. Respect the hind leg reach of pack mules and horses. Tighten your cinch before you mount. Ask your guide if you don't know what that means.

    You should be out of camp before Grey light unless elk are bugling right out of camp.

    Hunting elk is two parts Finding elk and then Killing elk. Your guide should be finding elk and then you need to be ready to kill. Don't expect the elk to hang around in range while you weigh the pros and cons. It is Shoot or no shoot...Know what a minimum shooter is in your mind before you leave camp and be sure your guide does as well.

    Nap at midday. The days are long.

  5. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to 2rocky For This Useful Post:


  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2rocky View Post
    Bnunley, prepare to see just how different hunting in Wyoming is. Expect big temp swings. I've had 25 degrees in the morning and 75 degrees in the same afternoon. Unless you are hunting with the owner/outfitter, the guide will probably either be more of a cowboy/horseman or an outdoorsman. Seldom will they be both.

    Get good at mounting and un mounting your horse and getting the rifle out of the scabbard. Don't put the rifle in the scabbard with a shell in the chamber EVER. Don't wrap the reins or lead rope around your hand. Respect the hind leg reach of pack mules and horses. Tighten your cinch before you mount. Ask your guide if you don't know what that means.

    You should be out of camp before Grey light unless elk are bugling right out of camp.

    Hunting elk is two parts Finding elk and then Killing elk. Your guide should be finding elk and then you need to be ready to kill. Don't expect the elk to hang around in range while you weigh the pros and cons. It is Shoot or no shoot...Know what a minimum shooter is in your mind before you leave camp and be sure your guide does as well.

    Nap at midday. The days are long.
    What he^^^ said..

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2rocky View Post
    Bnunley, prepare to see just how different hunting in Wyoming is. Expect big temp swings. I've had 25 degrees in the morning and 75 degrees in the same afternoon. Unless you are hunting with the owner/outfitter, the guide will probably either be more of a cowboy/horseman or an outdoorsman. Seldom will they be both.

    Get good at mounting and un mounting your horse and getting the rifle out of the scabbard. Don't put the rifle in the scabbard with a shell in the chamber EVER. Don't wrap the reins or lead rope around your hand. Respect the hind leg reach of pack mules and horses. Tighten your cinch before you mount. Ask your guide if you don't know what that means.

    You should be out of camp before Grey light unless elk are bugling right out of camp.

    Hunting elk is two parts Finding elk and then Killing elk. Your guide should be finding elk and then you need to be ready to kill. Don't expect the elk to hang around in range while you weigh the pros and cons. It is Shoot or no shoot...Know what a minimum shooter is in your mind before you leave camp and be sure your guide does as well.

    Nap at midday. The days are long.
    2rocky, That's a great response to the question. Lots of wisdom given in a quick answer...nice job!

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2rocky View Post
    Bnunley, prepare to see just how different hunting in Wyoming is. Expect big temp swings. I've had 25 degrees in the morning and 75 degrees in the same afternoon. Unless you are hunting with the owner/outfitter, the guide will probably either be more of a cowboy/horseman or an outdoorsman. Seldom will they be both.

    Get good at mounting and un mounting your horse and getting the rifle out of the scabbard. Don't put the rifle in the scabbard with a shell in the chamber EVER. Don't wrap the reins or lead rope around your hand. Respect the hind leg reach of pack mules and horses. Tighten your cinch before you mount. Ask your guide if you don't know what that means.

    You should be out of camp before Grey light unless elk are bugling right out of camp.

    Hunting elk is two parts Finding elk and then Killing elk. Your guide should be finding elk and then you need to be ready to kill. Don't expect the elk to hang around in range while you weigh the pros and cons. It is Shoot or no shoot...Know what a minimum shooter is in your mind before you leave camp and be sure your guide does as well.

    Nap at midday. The days are long.
    Perfect advice, That pretty much sums it up……. If I could add only one thing……. try not to change your diet too much!
    Life member RMEF
    Mathews DXT, Bowtech Admiral, Browing .300WSM...... and Swarovski Optiks my wife doesn't know about.
    1999 Washington Blacktaill, Bear River GMU, nontypical 6X7

  9. #18
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    Bnunley,
    I am from Mississippi too, and have hunted in Wyoming several times. Last year I hunted in Unit 100 and was unable to access the area from Oct. 14-16 due to heavy snow. It was fairly mild in Rock Springs, but the temperature drops fast as you gain altitude.
    The Tetons may be cold. You will definitely get a wide range of weather. So pack it all and sort out what you need once you get there.
    I was hunting DIY and had plenty of time to wait out the weather. You will have to hunt no matter what. So, take what you need.
    By the way, I totally agree with the others on the boots and moleskin thing. Wear a pair of liner socks under your main socks and keep the moleskin handy.

 

 

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