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  1. #1
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    Late Season Montana Elk

    I'm looking at putting together a late season (mid to late November) elk hunt in Montana sometime in the reasonably near future.

    Sorry if some questions are a repeat - I used the search function and came up empty so I thought I would ask away.

    1 - I assume most elk will have moved down out of the higher elevations by mid to late November. How much of an issue is private land ownership? Still plenty of quality public land in the lower elevations?

    2 - I assume the higher elevations will have significant snow fall by mid to late November. Is this accurate or is it more of a "hit or miss" variable?

    Any other info folks might have that is relevant to late season Montana elk would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    What is the reason why you want to do a Late Season hunt vs and earlier season? I'm assuming a rifle hunt?

  3. #3
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    Only time I can get off work.

  4. #4
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    It will really depend on the year and the area. Things can change fast that time of year.
    Keystone 1, Over!

    " I am lost in the dust of the chase that my life brings"

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    Have you narrowed it down to any specific area yet?

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    Yes been there done that and it all depends on area your hunting and the weather at the time. Lots of snow early may move them down but an elk can take a lot of snow to be pushed. You should worry more about hunting pressure pushing them to private the first week is the biggest issue in a lot of places.

  7. #7
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    My experience tells me that elk don't migrate as fast as some people think. I have seen elk at 9500 feet in elevation, in December, in 2 feet of snow, while cutting Christmas trees. I think the majority of animals do move down but I think hunting pressure moves them much more than fall weather. Hunting pressure can also push them up high, even with a lot of snow. Bottom line is that a late season hunt will usually mean elk really spread out on public or grouped on private to get away from pressure. The nice part is the big bulls will likely be alone and huntable. I like to track down late season bulls in the snow... hard but fun.

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  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hilltop View Post
    . ..... I like to track down late season bulls in the snow... hard but fun.
    This is a good point. We don't read a lot about the merits and excitement of tracking down big game. I think it is almost as exciting as calling in a bull. Years ago I started in on a large moose track early in the morning and caught up with my 47" Shiras bull at 2:00 in the afternoon. To add to the excitement and the satisfaction of being successful, it was the last day of the season. Tracking has worked for me many times over the years. The satisfaction of outsmarting a bull elk at what he does best is most rewarding.

 

 

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