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  1. #1
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    Care of Deer Hide in Field

    Hi All

    I apologize if that has been covered but I did search through some old threads to make sure it wasn't too recent or obvious. I might be being optimistic but I want to know the proper way to care for a deer hide in the field. If I do happen to down a buck this year, it would not only be my first archery deer but my first buck period and I would like to save the hide to make a blanket or quiver or something cool like that. Growing up, we never used the hides so I just never saw how to do it right.

    From what I have read online, all you need to do is clean the hide really well and pack it with salt. What is not clear to me are the following:

    1.) Should the hide be rolled up or does it need to be exposed to air? If it needs to be exposed, how should it be transported in the truck bed?
    2.) How soon does the hide need to be taken to the processor?
    3.) What are any tricks or hints that y'all have come up with to get better/more efficient results?

    I'm not worried about the cape or anything because I am going to just euro mount the head. Thanks in advance for any help on this one!

  2. #2
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    It is best to lay it out flat, OUT of the sun. After the first 24 hours, dump the old salt off, and resalt a second time. After the salt has cured the hide the second time, it will begin to stiffen the hide, it then can be folded or rolled up before it gets too hard. After the hide is cured to this stage,be sure to keep it dry, and free of bugs until you get it to your processor. Get it to your processor the sooner the better so you do not risk any damage or slippage to your hide. Hope this helps you!

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  4. #3
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    The salt doen't really "cure" the hide, but rather brings out all the moisture. You can salt and roll them up for a few days and keep it in a cool environment with no problem. If it will be some time until you get it to the processor, put it in your freezer until you can take it.

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  6. #4
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    One other thing I always do is to "flesh" the hide as much as I can. This means removing as much fat and tissue as you can before you salt it down. I like to use a big butter or table knife and scrape the hell out of it. This helps keep anything from starting to spoil or rot.
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  8. #5
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    I'm not sure you need to salt your hide in the field as your thread is asking. I personally have never salted a hide in the field. Once the hide is off lay it out hair down out of direct sunlight while you are caring for the meat. When your ready to head out fold up the hide flesh to flesh then roll it up and take it home or to camp. Once there then you can salt the way the guys above have advised you to do.

    Good luck on your hunt.
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  10. #6
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    I read somewhere about salting bear hides and you are supposed to use salt without Iodine and the article went on to say that about 30 pounds for an average size bear. Not sure how an average size bear equates to a deer but I would guess half? You may also want to inquire with a local taxidermist for prep instructions. Good luck and God bless

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  12. #7
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    I have never heard of that much salt on any type of hide. Several pounds once or possibly twice if you don't have a freezer to put it in before you get it to the processor is all you need. I usually spread it out thoroughly and even rub it into the hide some with my bare hand before rolling it up.

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  14. #8
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    Lots of the taxidermists I've talked to say not freeze the hide with salt on it. Either salt them or freeze them, but not both. I've never salted anything, just froze them and have had good luck.

    newguy220

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    How do you freeze them in the field?

    I've been told flesh to flesh, then roll it up and get it cold. Freeze as soon as possible. I an intrigued by the salt method though, and I'm going to ask my taxidermist what he prefers.
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  17. #10
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    I sell deer hides every fall to a fur buyer. They absolutely will not buy a frozen hide- not sure why. They ask that it is reasonably fleshed and folded flesh to flesh and then kept cold but not frozen. They want the hide within 10 days of harvest. He told me I didn't need to salt at all either but again not sure why. I am guessing they use the hides hair off so I'm not sure how much methods need to vary for a fur on tan.

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