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Thread: practicing

  1. #11
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    3D courses are a lot of fun and great practice. Any of those in Wyoming? If not, you should set one up and charge people to shoot it.

    The apple on your dogs head idea depends on if it is a good dog or not!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drhorsepower View Post
    Soleadventure.com? Is that right? this weeks blog you should read.
    This is Mark from Sole Adventure, thanks for the mention.

    For me, practice all comes down to "practicing perfect". I try and make each and every shot count. I am not concerned with the highest amount of reps, but just the most amount of perfect shots. Everyone is different, but I usually shoot 20 or so arrows each session. Sometime I shoot more than one session a day, sometimes not.

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    I agree with perfect practice, that being said I tend to make my first arrow from 40-45 yards with a broadhead. This has helped my confidence and also helps me focus on the mechanics. I have a reinheart ball target that i take out and because of its size i can toss it down a hill or wherever, which gives me a change from the flat 45 yards my backyad offers. With that said focused practice is much better than no practice. Visualize the shot and make it happen this fall.
    Hunt Hard

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkTheFark View Post
    This is Mark from Sole Adventure, thanks for the mention.

    For me, practice all comes down to "practicing perfect". I try and make each and every shot count. I am not concerned with the highest amount of reps, but just the most amount of perfect shots. Everyone is different, but I usually shoot 20 or so arrows each session. Sometime I shoot more than one session a day, sometimes not.
    I like your blog. Read it every week now. I have sine catching up to do though. I just found it within the last month. Is there an app for blogs or anything. It is hard for me to keep up on certain blogs.

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    I am limited to 30 yards at home so I shoot as often as I can focusing on good form and muscle memory and just keeping my back strong. When I am able to go to the range I would shoot at a distance that is challenging for you say 20 yards longer than you plan to shoot for me that is normally 80 or even longer if no wind. Invest in a big target like 30" x 30" so you don't loose arrows this will magnify your errors so that you really reinforce what works other wise your are just reinforcing bad habbits. If you don't have the ability to shoot long range mark 4 penny sized dots on your target and shoot one arrow at each. Number your arrows and shoot them in order and pattern each one remove any flyers this will help you see your error instead of your total error.

  6. #16
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    One thing I would add... once you know your bow is sighted in and your form is good, stay away from shooting spots. Use a 3D target or even a paper target with a picture of an antelope.

    Stalking? Practice from a kneeling position.
    Blind? Set it up and shoot out of it a bunch!
    Former Wyoming Boy

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    Another good point is to move your target..whoever said they roll their target down a hill and then shoot at it.. Great idea. To many count on their range finders for yardages. My hunting buddies and i hang a target in the woods and take turns picking shots. No rangefinders its all guesswork. We lose a few arrows but it has been by far the best practice for us..I should mention it does get just a tad competitive. But it really makes you make every shot count. As mentioed perfect practice..

  8. #18
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    ok i usually shoot at my buddies house, we always start off with a 75 yard "cold shot". just like it is at that big elk, deer, ect... trying to 10 ring it. then we usually shoot from 50 yard to 80 yards. take are time shooting a little then setting around cooling off then shooting again. about 2 weeks before season when we start fine tuning all the pins, putting them where we want them.

    just for fun when we have a couple freinds over we will shoot making a game out of it. and every so often we will brake out the long bows and play around. last year we had 10 guys, you shot 1 arrow closest to the target got to pick the next shot. so next shot could be 80 yard (w/ long bow) or shooting out of a swing at 20 yard. always fun to change it up

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    If you already "know how to shoot", then in general, practice should be about reinforcing good habits and eliminating bad ones. Each practice session should have a purpose, too. I don't think you have to have a written plan (but it probably wouldn't hurt), but you should be clear on your goal for the session. These goals could be simple/general or complex and very specific.

    That said, my most general rules are:
    * Never force myself to continue shooting - especially if you're not shooting well
    * Always end on a high note
    * Really try to make your first shot of the day "count". I grade my overall progress on this shot.
    * Keep practice fun

    Finally, I just read one of Cameron Hanes articles, and he mentioned that he doesn't really get caught up on the distances, e.g. shooting in his living room is fine, as long as he shoots daily. His goal is to "grease the groove", or make the shot process totally automatic. I like that. It's also very applicable to all sports, or skill-oriented tasks.

    BTW, great suggestions for spicing up your practice, folks! Thanks for staring a good thread, too!

  10. #20
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    i am not a bowhunter yet, but this will be my first season. i got my bow in january and have been practicing as much as i can. one thing i do in anticipation of the season that might be rudimentary to some but i think it's helping is to practice quietly taking my arrows out of the quiver, getting them nocked, and attaching my release. i'm comfortable with my groupings so i've incorperated the set-up into my routine, to try and have that muscle memory. most of the time i can do it without taking my eyes off of my target. i'd hate to be fumbling an arrow or with my release before i get an opportunity to arrow my first animal.

    another thing i do to try and be as ready as possible is to elevate my heart rate as much as possible before i shoot. i look like a fool standing out in the field, doing high knees for a couple of minutes and then quickly stopping and drawing my bow, but i've gotten a lot better at controling my breathing and steadying myself, incase i come up on an animal after climbing 1000 ft or my nerves take over when i see a huge deer.

    to help with my novice range estimation, i will walk around in the field with my head pointed straight at the ground, walking in random zig-zags and circles before looking at the target. i believe that this gives me a better sense of not being able to guess the range from the amount of steps i've taken, plus no shot is ever the same. i do this one shot at a time, to truly evaluate if i over-estimated or under estimated my distance. it's awfully easy to correct that second shot, haha. i'm more interested with the shot that didn't hit where i wanted it to, to try and figure out what i could have done different.

 

 

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